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Eye On Boise

Posts tagged: law enforcement

Military equipment in demand among Idaho police agencies

Idaho law enforcement agencies have received at least 2,905 pieces of donated military equipment worth more than $9.3 million, mostly during the past three years, the Idaho Statesman reports today, according to data from the Idaho State Police. They range from $1 pliers to MRAPs - mine-resistant ambush protected armored vehicles - worth anywhere from $412,000 to $733,000. Last September, the Idaho State Police requested a cargo plane. The MRAPs went to six police departments: Boise, Caldwell, Nampa, Pocatello, Post Falls and Preston.

The Statesman’s full report is online here. Reporters John Sowell and Audrey Dutton report that the military trappings are in high demand among Idaho agencies, and at least one local police department has received more military firearms than it has officers on its force.

Twelve win Idaho Medal of Honor, 10 peace officers and two firefighters

Two firefighters and a state trooper rescued two children trapped in an overturned car in Fernan Lake. A Jerome police officer risked his life to apprehend a suspect during a high-speed pursuit in Jerome, even after being shot in the eye. Two Lewiston police officers rescued a victim who was trapped in a burning apartment. All are among the 10 peace officers and two firefighters who are being awarded the Idaho Medal of Honor this year, which will be bestowed in a ceremony next Friday at the Idaho Peace Officers Memorial in Meridian. “These twelve professionals have gone above and beyond the call of duty in their commitment to the service of others,” said Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, chairman of the Idaho Medal of Honor Commission.

The medal was created in 2004 and the first honoree was slain Idaho State Trooper Linda Huff; click below for the full announcement, including the list of this year's 12 honorees and what they did.

Two Idaho tribes get U.S. Justice Dept. grants for law enforcement, safety

The U.S. Justice Department has awarded $1.9 million in grants to the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Nez Perce Tribe in Idaho to “enhance law enforcement practices and sustain crime prevention and intervention efforts.” The grants are for eight specific aims: Public safety and community policing; methamphetamine enforcement; justice systems relating to alcohol and substance abuse; corrections and correctional alternatives; programs targeting violence against women; programs targeting elder abuse; juvenile justice; and tribal youth programs. U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson, who announced the grants today, said, “I am pleased to see such significant federal grant support to these two Idaho tribes. The U.S. Attorney's office is committed to working closely with and supporting public safety in Indian country.” You can read the full announcement here.

Idaho tribes look to federalize their police to bridge jurisdiction gaps

Federal authorities say jurisdictional gaps are hampering law enforcement in Indian country, so they're working with three Idaho tribes, including the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, to federalize tribal police officers and let them issue federal citations to non-Indians on the reservation for certain minor offenses. Once the lengthy process is completed - likely in time for next summer's boating season - non-tribal members who are boating on the southern third of Lake Coeur d'Alene and violate boating laws could get tickets issued by tribal officers and backed by the federal court. The southern third of the lake belongs to the tribe; the U.S. Supreme Court decided that in 2001.

The other two tribes working with the U.S. Attorney's office and the federal courts to federalize their officers are the Nez Perce and the Shoshoshone-Bannocks; you can read my full story here.

Six to receive Idaho Medal of Honor

It was an evening last June when an EMS crew from the Coeur d'Alene Fire Department was dispatched to a scene where a vehicle had crashed into a home. Firefighters Nathan Hyder and Dylan Clark found a truck crashed into the garage, its wheels still spinning, its accelerator pressed to the floor, with the female driver unconscious inside and the garage so filled with black smoke and flying debris from the spinning tires that there was no visibility at all. Despite great risk, the donned their breathing apparatus, entered the garage, broke out a window of the pickup, turned off the ignition and rescued the driver, saving her life. Now they're both receiving the State of Idaho Law Enforcement, Firefighting and EMS Medal of Honor, as are three Boise police officers, Adam Crist, Casey Hancuff and Jason Rose, who rescued a critically injured shooting victim in August of 2010; and a U.S. Forest Service law enforcement officer who was killed in a gunfight in 1989, Brent “Jake” Jacobson. Jacobson, who was pursuing brothers James and Joseph Pratt after a home-invasion robbery and hostage situation in Sagle when he was shot, is receiving the award posthumously.

The Medal of Honor, which the Idaho Legislature established in 2004, is presented each year at the Idaho Peace Officers Memorial ceremony, which this year is scheduled for Friday at 10 a.m.; the first recipient was slain Idaho state Trooper Linda Huff. “By their selfless actions, these six professionals demonstrated their commitment to the service of others,” said Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, who chairs the Idaho Medal of Honor Commission. There's more info here about the award and recipients.

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About this blog

Betsy Z. Russell covers Idaho news from The Spokesman-Review's bureau in Boise.

Named best state-based political blog in Idaho for 2013 by The Fix

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