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Fri., Jan. 11, 2013, 12:39 p.m.

Monopoly Car facing axe

Hasbro Incorporated is playing a sick game of social Darwinism with their Monopoly game pieces. In an effort to breathe fresh life into the classic board game they plan on introducing a new token.  To make room for it they’ll need to kill off one of the current players: Scottie dog, the iron, wheelbarrow, shoe, top hat, thimble, battleship or the beloved race car.  The sickest part is they want the general public to act as jury to the execution.

They call it the “Save Your Token” campaign.  Fans are asked to vote until Feb. 5 on the Monopoly Facebook page for the token they don’t want Uncle Pennybags to murder.  The token with the least amount of votes will be “retired”.   

It would be easy to assume as the obvious favorite of the bunch the race car should be clear of harm’s way.  Think again.  Jonathan Berkowitz, vice president of marketing for Hasbro Gaming has expressed a disturbing indifference to the possibility of a car-cleansed Monopoly.  As a child he morbidly recalls:

"...Grabbing that token and that being your icon that represents you in the game. That passes down from generation to generation. I see it with my kids today. I'm the race car, and they can't be the race car. They can get their own."

Then why threaten the car, Berkowitz?

Berkowitz is sick; drunk with power.  Unfortunately not voting to save the car in his twisted campaign sends a clear message you’d just as soon be the iron, and we both know that’s a lie; nobody likes the iron.  

For those who run the risk of falling victim to such murderous apathy I recommend taking a moment to read up on The Strange History of the Monopoly Car.

Caring is the first step towards casting a vote.  

 

SOURCE:

Detroit Free Press




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