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Community Comment

Archive for July 2012

Jeanie of Spokane in hospital…

Good evening, Netizens…

 

I spoke with Jeanie of Spokane's significant other, Mechanic Man, this evening to see how Jeanie was doing in her post-operation recovery. In case you hadn't been following the news relating to Jeanie, today she had both her kidneys removed as they no longer were functioning.

 

One of my first questions I asked Jeanie several weeks ago, feeling rather stupid about it was, “how do you continue living without your kidneys?”

 

I was aware that Jeanie has been on kidney dialysis for months and months, and as her kidneys had decreased their functionality to the point where they had ceased operating, the decision was made to remove them both, a decision which one never takes very lightly. The answer to my question was simply that one continues with dialysis and hope for a kidney transplant, should a donor become available.

 

So tonight as another beautiful summer's day comes to an end, I hold Jeanie fondly in my thoughts, praying all the time for her speedy recovery.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — gimbal

July 31, 2012

Word of the Day

  • gimbal
  • audio pronunciation
  • \GHIM-bul\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a device that permits a body to incline freely in any direction or suspends it so that it will remain level when its support is tipped — usually used in plural; called also gimbal ring
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“In general, typical tracking mechanisms have the laser mounted on a gimbal, which is controlled with digital servos.” — From Stamatios V. Kartalopoulos's 2011 book Free Space Optical Networks for Ultra-Broad Band Services

“When the vessel turns upright in the ocean, much of the furniture and equipment swings on gimbals so that is in the right place when the ship becomes perfectly vertical.” — From an article by Gary Robbins in The San Diego Union-Tribune, June 25, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

One place you might encounter gimbals is on a ship, where they are used to keep compasses and other things level with the horizon in contrast to the pitch and roll of the vessel at sea. The word “gimbal” is an alteration of “gemel,” a word for a type of finger-ring popular in the 16th century that could be divided into two separate rings. The word comes from Anglo-French “gemel” (“twin”), which in turn comes from Latin “gemellus,” a diminutive of “geminus,” the Latin word for “twin.”

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#rKPJOukJ0k1X7Qv3.99

A Word A Day — spoonerism

July 30, 2012

Word of the Day

  • spoonerism
  • audio pronunciation
  • \SPOO-nuh-riz-um\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a transposition of usually initial sounds of two or more words
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Children will be delighted by Jon Scieszka's use of wordplay in Baloney (Henry P.), including the spoonerism “sighing flossers” for “flying saucers.”

“Thursday afternoon, Barack Obama presided over the unveiling of George W. Bush's official portrait in the White House, a warm event that reminds us: It feels like years since President Dubya regaled the world with his famous spoonerisms. His retirement has been defined by an awkward silence. While John McCain's endorsement was trumpeted by Mitt Romney, Bush delivered his in just four words. ‘I'm for Mitt Romney,’ he shouted to a journalist as an elevator door closed between them. If, just for old time's sake, Bush had said, ‘I'm for Ritt Momney,’ it would have been perfect.” — From an article in CNN Wire, June 1, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

Poor William Archibald Spooner! That British clergyman and educator, who lived from 1844 to 1930, often had to speak in public, but he was a nervous man and his tongue frequently got tangled up. He would say things like “a blushing crow” when he meant “a crushing blow.” Spooner's letter reversals became the stuff of legend—and undoubtedly gave his listeners many a laugh. By1900 his name had inspired the term “spoonerism,” which lives on to this day.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — deep-six

July 29, 2012

Word of the Day

  • deep-six
  • audio pronunciation
  • \DEEP-SIKS\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to get rid of : discard, eliminate
2
: to throw overboard
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Citing budget concerns, the city council announced that it has deep-sixed plans to repave the city's bike trails.

“The nationalist and confrontational Putin has already made it clear that he intends to deep-six Mr. Medvedev's friendly and cooperative approach to the US, and to Obama in particular.” — From an article by Howard LaFranchi in The Christian Science Monitor, June 18, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

Before the introduction of shipboard sonar, water depth was measured by hand with a sounding line. This was generally a rope weighted at one end, with bits of leather called “marks” tied on at intervals to measure the fathoms. Between the marks, fathoms were estimated by “deeps.” The “leadsman” (pronounced LEDZ-mun) lowered the line into the water and called out the depth as the rope passed through his hands: “By the mark twain!” at two fathoms; “By the deep six!” at six fathoms. Perhaps due to an association with “six feet under” (dead and buried), to give something the “deep six” (or to “deep-six” it) was to throw it overboard, or, by extension, to discard it. In the mid-1960s “deep-six” made landfall; since then it has been used as much by landlubbers as by old salts.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

Pandemonium on a grand scale…

Good morning, Netizens…

 

I sat up long past my bedtime the other night to pay homage to “The Aisles of Wonder”, the World Olympic Ceremonies. In retrospect, perhaps I need not to have bothered, as I could have easily gotten by on the pictures and sounds on the Internet, rather than endure nearly four hours of fireworks, pandemonium and glitz. It has been said that this the various countries took less time getting into the Olympic Ceremonies stadium than ever before. The only part about the prolonged march of the countries was how many of the billion-plus television viewers recognized the names of all the countries. While the names of the countries of the world may change, the politics goes on forever.

 

I also question whether the viewing audience could have fully understood the symbolism of the various scenarios presented in the early minutes of the ceremonies, were it not for the explanations of the television announcers.

 

I admit I was amused at the grand entrance of a person who ostensibly was Her Royal Majesty the Queen of England. The stand-in queen flew in by helicopter from Buckingham Palace to the World Olympic grounds and then jumped out of the helicopter and flew by para-glider into the stadium. An eighty-some year old matriarch of England jumping out of a helicopter is a bit much, in my opinion, especially with her knickers flapping in the breeze.

 

Once all the preliminaries were out of the way, the stadium fully-populated with contestants, as wrong as it might be, I resigned myself to other television fare, or turned the damned thing off entirely. The World Olympics simply isn't my cup of tea to begin with. Of course, your results may differ.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — vilipend

July 28, 2012

Word of the Day

  • vilipend
  • audio pronunciation
  • \VIL-uh-pend\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to hold or treat as of little worth or account
2
: to express a low opinion of : disparage
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

As a women's movement pioneer, Susan B. Anthony fought against the dictums of those who would vilipend women by treating them as second-class citizens.

“But many accepted canine breeds began in lowly circumstances. No matter how we may vilipend their names, denying their cuteness is difficult.” — From Bill Casselman's 2010 book Where a Dobdob Meets a Dikdik

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Vilipend” first appeared in English in the 15th century and comes to us through French from the Latin roots “vilis,” meaning “cheap” or “vile,” plus “pendere,” meaning “to weigh” or “to estimate.” These roots work in tandem to form a meaning of “to deem to be of little worth.” Both of those roots have weighed in heavily as a source of common English words. Other “vilis” offspring include “vile” and “vilify,” while “pendere” has spawned such terms as “append,” “expend,” and “dispense.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

The path to just\ice narrows…

Good morning, Netizens…

 

If it were up to me, this man, Karl F. Thompson, Jr. would already be serving a sentence in prison, eating prison chow and sleeping at nights carefully guarding his backside, not living in his plush house with his ex-wife who conveniently divorced Karl to shield his assets.

 

The Spokesman-Review has done a first-rate job of keeping this man, (Klubber) Karl F. Thompson, Jr. firmly affixed in the collective eyes of Spokane, and rightfully so. Kudos to journalists, editors, attorney’s and support staff of the SR for having helped bring us to this point in time. I admit this is one of my favorite pictures of Thompson. He is holding Otto Zehm's paycheck in his hand and to my way of seeing it, he has that look of a deer caught in your headlights just before impact with your car. Well, the impact may be drawing closer, what with the unsealing of the records of the jurors who sat in judgment of Karl F. Thompson. Karl is slowly running out of places to hide his culpability.

 

Karl was tried and convicted of using excessive force and lying to investigators during his encounter with Zehm, a 36-year-old janitor, who was beaten to a frazzle and then choked to death on the floor of a Zip Trip Store. There were lies, multiple attempts at obfuscating the truth from the jury that convicted Thompson. We may never truly know where to place all the blame for the death of Otto Zehm and the cover-up that followed.

 

There are some who undoubtedly will ask why I cannot let the death of Otto Zehm pass without comment or why I refuse to let Karl F. Thompson hide his guilt behind his attorney. Justice, even locked behind bars surrounded by semi-demonic inmates in a prison is still better than dying on the floor of a Zip Trip.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — intestine

July 27, 2012

Word of the Day

  • intestine
  • audio pronunciation
  • \in-TESS-tin\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: internal; specifically : of or relating to the internal affairs of a state or country
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

News reports of intestine disagreements between the country's two most powerful political factions led to murmurings that the country was on the precipice of civil war.

“Last week U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon instructed Valerie Amos to leave for Syria in order to assess the humanitarian situation in the country and agree with the authorities on ways to provide aid to the population hit by the intestine war.” — From an article by the ITAR-TASS News Agency, March 1, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

We bet you thought “intestine” was a noun referring to a part of the digestive system! It is, of course, but naming that internal body part isn't the word's only function. Both the noun and the adjective “intestine” have been a part of English since the 15th century, and both trace to the Latin adjective “intestinus,” meaning “internal,” and ultimately to “intus,” meaning “within.” Though the adjective “intestine” turns up much less frequently than does its anatomical cousin, it does see occasional use, especially as a synonym for “civil” and “domestic” (in contrast to “foreign”) applied to wars and disturbances.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

Super Mitt-- fact or fiction?

Good morning, Netizens…

 

Cartoonist David Horsey asks some of the hard questions about Mitt Romney's Presidential candidacy.

 

The national news media is full of constant infighting between Obama and Mitt Romney, perhaps no more so than the endless bickering over Romney's tax returns. However if one looks closely enough, you will quickly see there are potentially more secrets buried inside the Romney other than his income taxes.

 

The most-essential question that bothers me is just who the hell is Mitt Romney? He took properly-conservative public positions as the Governor of Massachusetts on gay rights, abortion, healthcare and immigration, positions, some of which he seems to have tried to recently ignore. It is really difficult to get Romney to to clearly state his position on big government without lapsing into generalities and wasted airspace.

 

One thing is certain to me: he doesn't want to disclose all of his taxes. What is he hiding? It isn't just members of the Left Wing that are clamoring for full disclosure, either. The National Review, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and a long list of other Republican officeholders and conservative commentators are demanding access to Romney's tax records. The only member of the Right Wing who seemingly is urging him to stand his ground is Rush Limbaugh, if that counts for anything.

 

Of course, no tale of “The Mittman” would be complete without mentioning the list of his potential running mates. Some are saying he will have to find someone from within the ranks of the Mormon Church or face the wrath of his Bishop. Who might that be?

 

There are a lot of unanswered questions about just who the Mittman might be, once he takes off his costume.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — plage

July 26, 2012
Word of the Day

    plage
    audio pronunciation
    \PLAHZH\

    DEFINITION

noun
1
: the beach of a seaside resort
2
: a bright region on the sun caused by the light emitted by clouds of calcium or hydrogen and often associated with a sunspot

    EXAMPLES

“Vying with Aquitaine for diversity within a single region, the Rhône-Alpes take you from plage to peak via a millennia or two of communities wonderfully wearing their history in their stones.” — From an article by Simon Calder in The Independent (London), May 26, 2012

“Sunspots and other storm centers at the surface usually lie within vast regions of strong and tangled magnetic fields, called plages.” — From an article by Robert Irion in Science, March 10, 2000


 From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — florid

July 25, 2012

Word of the Day

  • florid
  • audio pronunciation
  • \FLOR-id\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

1
: very flowery in style : ornate; also : having a florid style
2
a : tinged with red : ruddy b : marked by emotional or sexual fervor
3
: fully developed : manifesting a complete and typical clinical syndrome
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Jimmy mopped his florid face and struggled to continue delivering his speech despite the overwhelming heat in the auditorium.

“On Thursday afternoon, peacocking judge Steven Tyler announced his departure after two years with a florid statement about going back to his first love, Aerosmith.” — From an article by Gil Kaufman at mtv.com, July 13, 2012

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — yawp

July 24, 2012

Word of the Day

  • yawp
  • audio pronunciation
  • \YAWP\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to make a raucous noise : squawk
2
: clamor, complain
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

I'm not one to yawp, but I was quite upset that we had to wait a week for a reply to our inquiry.

“Frogs croaked, nightbirds yawped, bats whirred….” — From Joe Kane's 2011 book Running the Amazon

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Yawp” first appeared sometime in the 14th century. This verb comes from Middle English “yolpen,” most likely itself derived from the past participle of “yelpen,” meaning “to boast, call out, or yelp.” Interestingly, “yawp” retains much of the meaning of “yelpen,” in that it implies a type of complaining which often has a yelping or squawking quality. An element of foolishness, in addition to the noisiness, is often implied as well. “Yawp” can also be a noun meaning “a raucous noise” or “squawk.” The noun “yawp” arrived on the scene approximately 500 years after the verb. It was greatly popularized by “Song of Myself,” a poem by Walt Whitman containing the line “I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — welkin

July 23, 2012

Word of the Day

  • welkin
  • audio pronunciation
  • \WEL-kin\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
a : the vault of the sky : firmament b : heaven
2
: the upper atmosphere
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The pink sky at sunset brought to mind a quote from Shakespeare's King John: “The sun of heaven, methought, was loath to set / But stay'd and made the western welkin blush.”

“Murray won the first set 6-4…. The welkin shook with British joy. The last Brit to win the Wimbledon title had been Fred Perry, in 1936.” — From a blog post by Calvin Tomkins at The New Yorker (online), July 9, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

When it comes to “welkin,” the sky's the limit. This heavenly word has been used in English to refer to the vault of the sky since at least the 12th century, and it derives from an earlier word from Old English that meant “cloud.” In current English, “welkin” is still flying high, and it is often teamed with the verb “ring” to suggest a loud noise or an exuberant expression of emotion, as in “the welkin rang with the sound of the orchestra” or “her hearty laugh made the welkin ring.” These contemporary phrases echo an older use—the original words of a carol that once began “Hark, how all the welkin ring,” which we now know as “Hark! The herald angels sing.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — vanward

July 22, 2012

Word of the Day

  • vanward
  • audio pronunciation
  • \VAN-werd\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: located in the vanguard : advanced
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The company is looking to hire a marketing director who is savvy in social media and other vanward marketing tactics.

“The New Jersey Festival of Electronic Arts, held today from 1 to 8 p.m. … is described as 'an exploration of electronic, environmental and performance art … where AV geeks are vanward and hip.''' — From an events listing in The Star-Ledger (Newark, New Jersey), March 10, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

The troops at the head of an army are called the “vanguard,” and that word can also mean “the forefront of an action or movement.” It was “vanguard,” rather than “vanward,” that led the way on the route into English. “Vanguard” was first documented in English in the 15th century. By the early 17th century, it was sometimes shortened to “van”—a reference might be made to an army's “van and rear.” Some 200 years later “vanward” brought up the rear, making its English debut when writers appended “-ward,” an adjective suffix meaning “is situated in the direction of,” to the shortened “van,” thereby creating a word meaning “in the forefront.”

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#dT36jvH2cluWZXCT.99

A Word A Day — fructify

July 21, 2012

Word of the Day

  • fructify
  • audio pronunciation
  • \FRUK-tuh-fye\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to bear fruit
2
: to make fruitful or productive
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The company hopes that its new business partnerships will fructify in the coming months.

“The severe water crisis in Delhi is likely to continue as city government's efforts to get additional water from neighbouring Haryana to ease the worsening situation did not fructify.” — From an article on rediff.com, June 12, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Fructify” derives from Middle English “fructifien” and ultimately from the Latin noun “fructus,” meaning “fruit.” When the word was first used in English in the 14th century, it literally referred to the actions of plants that bore fruit; later it was used transitively to refer to the action of making something fruitful, such as soil. The word also expanded to encompass a figurative sense of “fruit,” and it is now more frequently used to refer to the giving forth of something in profit from something else (such as dividends from an investment). “Fructus” also gave us the name of the sugar “fructose,” as well as “usufruct,” which refers to the legal right to enjoy the fruits or profits of something that belongs to someone else.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — slew

July 20, 2012

Word of the Day

  • slew
  • audio pronunciation
  • \SLOO\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a large number
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The school's football team hosts a slew of talented players this year.

“A slew of retirements and a changing presidential election landscape have made for some ups and downs for the two parties in this year's fight for the Senate.” — From an article by Stuart Rothenberg in Roll Call, June 21, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Slew” appeared as an American colloquialism in the early 19th century. Its origins are unclear, but it is perhaps taken from the Irish “slua,” a descendant of Old Irish “slúag,” meaning “army,” “host,” or “throng.” “Slew” has several homographs (words that are spelled alike but different in meaning, derivation, or pronunciation) in English. These include: “slew” as the past tense of the verb “slay”; “slew” as a spelling variant of “slough,” a word which is also commonly pronounced \SLOO\ and which means “swamp,” “an inlet on a river,” or “a creek in a marsh or tide flat”; and the verb “slew,” meaning “to turn, veer, or skid.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

A Word A Day — luciferin

July 19, 2012

Word of the Day

  • luciferin
  • audio pronunciation
  • \loo-SIF-uh-rin\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: any of various organic substances in luminescent organisms (as fireflies) that upon oxidation produce a virtually heatless light
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Luciferins vary in chemical structure; the luciferin of luminescent bacteria, for example, is completely different from that of fireflies.” — From an article at Encyclopædia Britannica Online, 2012

“Light is produced by fireflies through a chemical reaction between luciferin and its enzyme counterpart, luciferase.” — From an article at photonics.com, June 20, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Luciferin” got its name from the Latin word “lucifer” (meaning “light-bearing”), which is also a source of the word that is sometimes used as a name of the devil. We won't go into how Lucifer came to be called by that name—suffice it to say he wasn't always associated with darkness—but we will look a bit more closely at the Latin word “lucifer.” It comes from Latin “luc-,” meaning “light,” plus “-fer,” meaning “bearing” or “producing.” Additional relatives include the nontechnical adjective “luciferous,” meaning “bringing light or insight,” and “luciferase,” the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

Put a little spark in your life…

 

Good afternoon Netizens…

 

Clatter, bang, sizzle. Clatter, bang, sizzle, rumble.

 

I have forborne the talking idiots on television weather the last day or so, because they do not know of that which they speak when they describe the events of yesterday morning as “severe thunderstorms”, at least here in Spokane. Having lived in the Midwest, South and other places where truly severe thunderstorms are commonplace rather than the exception to the rule, I can only recall one time in my 20-something year history of living in the Spokane when I actually witnessed a severe thunderstorm, and that was when I was living in Stevens County which, in those days, didn't necessarily appear on the Spokane weather reports, anyhow.

 

If I wanted to reliably know the weather forecast in those days, I did as I have always done, and watch the skies plus whatever technology that was available at the time. (The state of our NEXRAD weather radar in those days left a lot to be desired, unfortunately). The wildlife always showed when a pretty good thunderstorm was imminent because they would all but disappear into the thickets and woods before things started getting interesting.

 

One of my clients who lives down in Alabama, once described a severe thunderstorm as rattling the windows in his house in their casements as something that goes on for an hour or more, with each lightning strike hitting about every two minutes or so and lasting for nearly an hour. If you can accept this definition of a severe thunderstorm, by comparison, yesterday we only had one lightning strike that rattled the windows, although there were numerous rumbles and grumbles off in the distance.

 

I would imagine that others than myself may have even had “close encounters” with lightning. My first took place when the lightning struck our old-time hand crank telephone and then jumped from it to the furnace thermostat. We heard, rather than saw the spark jump, about the same time as the thunder rattled the entire house. We knew we had been hit, and when the batteries in the telephone began smoking, we knew the phone had taken a hit. It wasn't until later we learned about the thermostat and even the furnace itself. I don't care what anyone says, stay off the phone during a lightning storm.

 

Of course no tale of lightning strikes is complete without the obscure, where lightning did the unpredictable and even frightening. My grandmother, grandfather and I were standing at one end of the kitchen during a truly Midwestern severe thunderstorm, but in the muggy heat, we had left the back door open, with just a screen door between us and the lightning out-of-doors. Once again, all we saw was the simultaneous bright flash of light and the immediate crash of the thunder. My grandmother screamed, because a butcher knife that had been sitting on her new electric stove went flying across the room six feet and stuck in the bathroom door, about two inches deep. All the lights went out, and much to our chagrin, we later learned we had to replace the electric stove, as it was fried, too. Warning!! Don't stand in front of a screen door during a lightning storm.

 

Perhaps the most-recent event, which took place at a doctor's house on the South Hill, set out to prove that a lightning strike can be devastating. The lightning struck a tree about six feet from the doctor's house, burned a path across his lawn to his telephone box. However the damage to the good doctor didn't end there. Following his telephone lines, it jumped to his computer, frying all its components, then jumped to the microwave and ate it, too. In all it took a FAX machine, a Waring blender/mixer and several other pieces of kitchen electronics. The insurance claims ran into the thousands of dollars, and it took me over an hour to explain it to their disbelieving claims agent.

 

Of course during one of our trips to the Midwest, lightning hit my brother-in-law's corn silo, jumping from there to his Farmall Tractor, frying all the wiring on it, and then traveling across the yard about 20 feet or so and taking out his well pump controls. The next day a tornado narrowly missed the farm.

 

So I've had my adventures with lightning storms. What about you?

 

Dave

Word of the day — beguile

Word of the Day for Wednesday, July 18, 2012

beguile \bih-GAHYL\, verb:
1. To influence by trickery, flattery, etc.; mislead; delude.
2. To take away from by cheating or deceiving (usually followed by
of): to be beguiled of money.
3. To charm or divert: a multitude of attractions to beguile the
tourist.
4. To pass (time) pleasantly: beguiling the long afternoon with a good
book.

 Donovan was going to have to beguile Peter, but he hoped he
 wouldn't have to beguile Alex as well. It was a bad precedent to
 set, and he liked the honesty between the two of them.
 — Deborah Cooke, Kiss of Fury

 Sentences and sententiae alike charm and beguile even jaded
 undergraduates. Who but can marvel at such craftsmanship as these
 words incarnate…
 — George Douglas Atkins, Reading Essays

––––––––––––––––––––––-

Beguile is derived from the Middle English word bigilen, from the
root guile meaning “insidious cunning.”
  

Word of the day — deflagrate

Word of the Day for Tuesday, July 17, 2012

deflagrate \DEF-luh-greyt\, verb:

To burn, especially suddenly and violently.

 Then the split second realization that something was very, very
 wrong, as the electricity rushed down the thin wires, sending a
 spark across a gap in the blasting cap, detonating the cap and
 sending the shock wave into the explosive charge, causing it to
 deflagrate at blinding speed, quicker than the mind could
 imagine.
 — John F. Mullins, Into the Treeline

 Whereas Marcel finds disappointment in his return's incapacity to
 deflagrate, to 'flame up' his memory, Sassoon savours a kind of
 immediacy when he reaches the Rectory at Edingthorpe…
 — Robert Hemmings, Modern Nostalgia

––––––––––––––––––––––-

Deflagrate is derived from the Latin root flagrāre meaning “to
burn.” The common prefix de- can denote intensity, as well as
 removal.

A fairly commonplace word

Word of the Day for Monday, July 16, 2012

requisition \rek-wuh-ZISH-uhn\, noun:
1. A demand made.
2. The act of requiring or demanding.
3. An authoritative or formal demand for something to be done, given,
supplied, etc.: The general issued a requisition to the townspeople
for eight trucks.
4. A written request or order for something, as supplies.

verb:
1. To require or take for use; press into service.
2. To demand or take, as by authority, for military purposes, public
needs, etc.: to requisition supplies.

 But I have a friend of my own kidney who has often served me
 before, and I am going to make a requisition on him for this
 especial business.
 — Timothy Shay Arthur, Bell Martin

 Do you have the requisition for the special lecturer?
 — Ayn Rand, We the Living

Breast feeding in public

 

Good morning, Netizens…

 

I was cruising through Northtown Mall last week when I chanced upon a young mother breast-feeding her infant while sitting in the mall, and this morning, I came across a David Horsey cartoon that reminded me of that moment in time. Every now and then there is a news story about breast-feeding moms who run afoul of mall security guards, voyeurs or others who are offended by such behavior.

 

America's fixation for women's boobs has been with us for a long time now. Breast implants are big business from Coast to Coast. Clothes that lift, shape and present the female breast for inspection are available from a huge number of shopping malls across America, and yet there is something about a woman breast-feeding in a public place that creates havoc with public mindsets.

 

If people are uncomfortable about a woman breast-feeding a baby in public, they should simply turn away, letting the woman tend her baby in private. It is not a circumstance that should involve police, protests or morality lectures. Politely look away and let her discreetly feed her infant and give her her privacy in public.

 

Dave

Word of the Day

Word of the Day for Friday, July 13, 2012

tawpie \TAW-pee\, noun:

A foolish or thoughtless young person.

 Do ye no hear me, tawpie? Do ye no hear what I'm tellin' ye?
 — Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr
 Hyde and Weir of Hermiston

 You are just idle tawpies.
 — Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, Profit and Loss

––––––––––––––––––––––-

Tawpie comes from the Swedish word t??be meaning “a simpleton.”
  

<b>Dave</b>

Words of the day

Word of the Day for Thursday, July 12, 2012

paronymous \puh-RON-uh-muhs\, adjective:

Containing the same root or stem, as the words wise and wisdom.

 The sentence seems to reverberate with echoes of
 assonance—another distinctive trait of Haweke's writing often
 enriched with alliterative patterns or even rhymes—on both sides
 of the two central words: “pale petal,” whose juxtaposition
 involves an anagramatical and paronymous variation.
 — Heide Ziegler, Facing Texts

 This in itself is a significant achievement in a language so
 flowery and paronymous to the extent that exaggeration,
 especially at that time of its literary history, is widely
 considered to be one of its inherent characteristics.
 — Sabry Hafez, The Quest for Identities

––––––––––––––––––––––-

Paronymous stems from the Greek roots para- meaning “beside” and
onoma meaning “a name.”
  

Hotter than a biscuit!

 


Good afternoon, Netizens…

 

My God, it was only 5:05 this morning when the residential air conditioning kicked on saving our collective asses from another scorching hot day. As much as we feel the crunch of paying Avista Utilities for this somewhat questionable asset, yet when we compare living in our house bereft of air conditioning, sweating it out later in the day, suddenly that air conditioning is well worth the cost. Most of the houses in our neighborhood have one form or another of central air conditioning, although some have window-mounted air conditioning units while others have big fans mounted in their attic spaces that you can hear rumbling away during the heat of the day.

 

At four o'clock in the afternoon today, there is barely a breeze stirring the trees. This is a lot like living back in the Midwest, with the exception of the stately fields of corn that whisper to themselves at dusk, although I have it on good authority that, due to the drought in Nebraska, the corn this year is pretty puny by comparison to years gone by. Of course if I hear someone snorting with derision upon hearing the term global warming, I'll remind them of the impact of the drought in the Midwest and Southwest this spring and summer, and ask them how they like the sharply-increasing prices at the food markets. Of course, I always did say that farming is a lot like gambling with God Almighty. Sometimes you win, and on bad years you lose. Every year you plant your crops, watch the sky and pray. It's that simple.

 

The talking weather idiots are saying we could foresee a few more weeks of this heat wave before matters are restored to some degree of normalcy. It used to be that, if you wanted to forecast the weather, all you needed to do was step outside and peer at the sky. In modern times, we have come to rely on self-styled meteorologists who, by virtue of some degree of meteorological education, forecast the weather for us with some degree of reliability. We've had our share of mediocrity with regard to weather forecasters here in Spokane. They all seem to proclaim their reliability, but if the truth is known, we couldn't still do much better than simply watch the sky and occasionally pray for rain at appropriate occasions, preferably without hail or lightning, if you please.

 

Dave

 

 

 

Words of the day

Word of the Day for Wednesday, July 11, 2012

hypethral \hi-PEE-thruhl\, adjective:

(Of a classical building) wholly or partly open to the sky.

 Follow the gallery around for about a thousand paces until you
 come to the hypethral. With it dark out you might miss it, so
 keep an eye open for the plants.
 — Gene Wolfe, Shadow and Claw

 The choice of top light for the main galleries is said to have
 been dictated by the belief that Greek temples were hypethral,
 that is, open to the sky; from which it was inferred that Greek
 taste demanded to see works of art under light from above.
 — Benjamin Ives Gilman, Museum Ideals of Purpose and Method

––––––––––––––––––––––-

Hypethral stems from the Greek roots hyp- which means “under” and
a??thros meaning “clear sky.”

Words of the Day

<a href=”http://dictionary.reference.com/”>Dictionary.com</a>


Word of the Day

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

ectopic

\ ek-TOP-ik \  , adjective;
1. Occurring in an abnormal position or place; displaced.
Quotes:
It does not appear that any modern author, or any of our large numbers of “systems” of surgery, has taken up this important aspect ofectopic  tumors.”
Dr. Thomas H. Manley, The Medical Times and Register , Vol. 33 - 34
Diagnosis of ectopic  pregnancy was made and immediate operation decided upon.
Dr. J. Henry Barbat, Journal of the American Medical Association , Vol. 32
Origin:
Ectopic  is from the invented Greek word ectopia  meaning “out of place.” It was coined in 1873.
 
Dave

A Word A Day ends…

 

Good afternoon, Netizens…

 

It is with profound sadness that I must announce that the daily item known to one and all as A Word A Day will no longer be carried by Community Comment due to a copyright violation. Simply because I truly worship the idea of posting words and their definitions each day, I will begin carrying a new definition each day which I will call Words for the Day, whose source is not from copyrighted material nor in direct competition with A Word A Day.

 

As always, I encourage readers to comment upon or give input to the process by which words are included in our daily grammar and, if you have alternative definitions, please feel free to contribute or post them.

 

Again, my utter apologies for this change.

 

Dave

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