ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here

Community Comment

Archive for January 2013

Jeffreys, his wife and girlfriend in jail…

 

Good morning, Netizens…

 

A 73 count Federal indictment was unfurled against Gregory Jeffreys, his wife and ostensible girlfriend the other day, as I have often said would take place, and none too soon. I have been following the macabre trail of Jeffreys' financial dealings around for several years, largely due to an interest in a Spokane real estate appraiser's involvement and now that Jeffreys, his wife and girlfriend are in jail on $150,000 bond, it all seems like a slam dunk to me. You can read most of the gory details on the SR at http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2013/jan/31/feds-unseal-73-count-indictment-against-spokane/, although I admit I would have preferred to have read the indictment. Perhaps more than anything else, I would like to read the full, unexpurgated list of purported investors who bought into Jeffreys' Ponzi schemes, this time using the victim's full names, no initials this time around, if you please. There are more victims in Jeffreys victims list than just the banks.

 

The list of alleged crimes is nauseous, everything from phony developments of buildings and projects that didn't even exist to outright fraud.

 

Like nearly all truly good scams, it takes a lot of paper, just to document who did what to whom. If this ever comes to trial, I'd wager it will take a thousand pounds of paperwork to document what Jeffreys and company ostensibly managed to pull off. All that, of course, and then there is the ill-fated Ridpath Hotel.

 

Of course you do have to ask yourself, how many real estate appraisal firms actually refused to have anything to do with the Jeffreys coalition. How many appraisal firms saw through all the scams and phony business deals? Not that many, I'm sorry to say.

 

Dave

Words of the day — jabberwocky

Good morning, Netizens…

January 31, 2013

Words of the Day

  • jabberwocky
  • audio pronunciation
  • \JAB-er-wah-kee\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: meaningless speech or writing
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“The salesman started spewing computer jabberwocky at me like an auctioneer. I understood about every sixth word he uttered.”— From an article by Larry D. Clifton in The Tampa Tribune, September 6, 1998

“When LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh stepped into the crowded room, fashionably late, jabberwocky ceased and the only sound you heard was the whir and click of cameras.”— From an article by Greg Cote in The Miami Herald, September 28, 2010

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

In a poem titled “Jabberwocky” in the book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There (1872), Lewis Carroll warned his readers about a frightful beast:

Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

This nonsensical poem caught the public's fancy, and by 1902 “jabberwocky” was being used as a generic term for meaningless speech or writing. The word “bandersnatch” has also seen some use as a general noun, with the meaning “a wildly grotesque or bizarre individual.” It's a much rarer word than “jabberwocky,” though, and is entered only in our unabridged dictionary, Webster’s Third New International.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — malafide

Good evening Netizens…

January 30, 2013

Words of the Day

  • mala fide
  • audio pronunciation
  • \mal-uh-FYE-dee\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adverb or adjective

: with or in bad faith
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The company's board is accused of acting mala fide and with criminal intentions.

“NTC analyzes each traveler's risk before departure to identify … criminal activity, fraud, and other mala fide travelers, including U.S. citizens.” — From a document in Congressional Documents and Publications, September 11, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

You may be familiar with the more commonly used “bona fide” (boh-nuh-FYE-dee), which can mean “made in good faith” (as in “a bona fide agreement”) or “genuine or real” (“a bona fide miracle”). You also may have encountered the noun “bona fides,” used in reference to evidence of a person's good faith, genuineness, qualifications, or achievements. Not surprisingly, in Latin “bona fide” means “in good faith” and “mala fide” means “in bad faith.” These days “mala fide,” which dates from the mid-16th century, tends to turn up primarily in legal contexts.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#zlWv1wJqWtZgCYHE.99

Words of the day — nomothetic

Good morning, Netizens…

January 29, 2013

Words of the Day

  • nomothetic
  • audio pronunciation
  • \nah-muh-THET-ik\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: relating to, involving, or dealing with abstract, general, or universal statements or laws
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“Even the authors that emphasize the existence of cross-cultural differences … acknowledge that a nomothetic characterization of a country cannot apply equally to every member of its population.” — From an article by Jaime Bonache et al. in the Journal of Business Research, December 2012

“Moreover, there is the often-incorrect assumption that crimes and offenders are sufficiently similar to be lumped together for aggregate study. In such cases the resulting nomothetic knowledge is not just diluted, it is inaccurate and ultimately misleading.” — From Brent E. Turvey's 2011 book Criminal Profiling: An Introduction to Behavioral Evidence Analysis, Fourth Edition

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Nomothetic” is often contrasted with “idiographic,” a word meaning “relating to or dealing with something concrete, individual, or unique.” Where “idiographic” points to the specific and unique, “nomothetic” points to the general and consistent. The immediate Greek parent of “nomothetic” is a word meaning “of legislation”; the word has its roots in “nomos,” meaning “law,” and “-thetēs,” meaning “one who establishes.” “Nomos” has played a part in the histories of words as varied as “metronome,” “autonomous,” and “Deuteronomy.” The English contributions of “-thetēs” are meager (“nomothetic” is the only one in our Collegiate dictionary), but “-thetēs” itself comes from “tithenai,” meaning “to put,” and “tithenai” is the ancestor of many common words ending in “thesis”—“hypothesis,” “parenthesis,” “prosthesis,” “synthesis,” and “thesis” itself—as well as “theme,” “epithet,” and “apothecary.”

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/2013/01/29/#FslIDFhmQkl4Xa1R.99

Words of the day — gambit

Good evening, Netizens…

January 28, 2013

Word of the Day

  • gambit
  • audio pronunciation
  • \GAM-bit\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: a chess opening in which a player risks minor pieces to gain an advantage
2
: a remark intended to start a conversation
3
: a calculated move
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Mentioning that he had nothing to do on Saturday night was an obvious gambit by Miles to get invited to Donna's party.

“Square's gift card gambit is its latest stab at separating itself from a crowded field of competitors, including PayPal, Google, Intuit and Groupon.” — From an article by Jon Swartz in USA Today, December 10, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

In 1656, a chess handbook was published that was said to have almost a hundred illustrated “gambetts.” That early spelling of “gambit” is close to the Italian word, “gambetto,” from which it is derived. “Gambetto” was used for an act of tripping—especially one that gave an advantage, as in wrestling. The original chess gambit is an opening in which a bishop's pawn is sacrificed to gain some advantage, but the name is now applied to many other chess openings. After being pinned down to chess for about two centuries, “gambit” finally broke free of the hold and showed itself to be a legitimate contender in the English language by weighing in with other meanings.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Pillow talk…

 

Good morning, Netizens…

 

Just as an aside, if you are contemplating your typical departure for work this morning, you might want to carefully consider your options in our lovely community. That's because overnight it rained, which promptly froze to the streets and sidewalks in many areas. Judging by the number of spin-offs, wrecks and general mayhem taking place in this morning's commute, I would suggest in a mild-mannered fashion that before you hit the streets you might want to take a test stroll down your favorite street and see just how slick it really is where you live, and then readjust your itinerary accordingly.

 

I cannot stand upright on either my sidewalk nor on Morton this morning, and I have no idea how long it will be before the forecasted warmer temperatures arrive to eliminate the worst icing I have seen since Ice Storm.

 

Either take your chances or walk to work and wear a plump pillow on your behind. Now that might work.

 

Dave

Words of the day — satiate

Good morning, Netizens…

January 25, 2013

Word of the Day

  • satiate
  • audio pronunciation
  • \SAY-shee-ayt\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

: to satisfy (as a need or desire) fully or to excess
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

After eating three pieces of pie and one of cake at the potluck, Jamie's sweet tooth was finally satiated.

“Consequently, I have to satiate my craving for Louisiana citrus at Hollygrove Market and Farm or the Crescent City Farmers Market in Mid-City where locally grown fruits and vegetables abound. If you haven't treated yourself to a market visit lately, do.” — From an article by Melinda Shelton in the Times-Picayune (New Orleans), October 31, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Satiate,” “sate,” “surfeit,” “cloy,” “pall,” “glut,” and “gorge” all mean to fill to repletion. “Satiate” and “sate” sometimes imply only complete satisfaction but more often suggest repletion that has destroyed interest or desire, as in “Years of globe-trotting had satiated their interest in travel” and “Readers were sated with sensationalistic stories.” “Surfeit” implies a nauseating repletion, as in “They surfeited themselves with junk food,” while “cloy” stresses the disgust or boredom resulting from such surfeiting, as in “The sentimental pictures cloyed after a while.” “Pall” emphasizes the loss of ability to stimulate interest or appetite: “A life of leisure eventually began to pall.” “Glut” implies excess in feeding or supplying, as in “a market glutted with diet books.” “Gorge” suggests glutting to the point of bursting or choking, as in “They gorged themselves with chocolate.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Ah, the hell with it!

 

Good evening, Netizens…

 

At age 67, after more than 40 years of packing around a pack or more of cigarettes in my shirt pocket, today is the third (going on the fourth) day since I had my last cigarette. The ashtrays are all emptied, and the only sign that remains to tell anyone of my previous addiction to smoking is the box of smoker's patches sitting in the bathroom closet where most medicines in our house reside. I suppose they are a medicine, after all, since without them I probably would never have the temerity to quit smoking.

 

Perhaps the biggest loss once I began the planning process to successfully quit smoking this time (there were other attempts, all unsuccessful) was that I suddenly found my lifelong friend, that blithering idiot that talks to me from between my ears, suddenly was silenced. A lot of people noticed this, including my partner and friend, Jeanie, and even Dave Oliveria of Huckleberries Online. During the week leading up to when I smoked my last cigarette up until today, it couldn't be helped. Every voice inside my head was screaming at the top of their considerable lungs to have another cigarette and stop this madness.

 

I never made it this far with quitting cigarettes going “cold turkey”.

 

Thank God for the patch. At least I now know I can beat this addiction, and move onward with what is left of my life. I did know I had to plan this exercise, though, and that required a few trips to the doctor's office, a prescription or two and some timing. Now that everything is in place and I am going on day four, I am feeling almost normal for me. Thanks to everyone for your concerns. According what I already know, I should be almost “normal” in two days or so. The technicians tell me it just gets better from there.

 

Dave

Words of the day — engage

Good evening, Netizens…

January 24, 2013

Words of the Day

  • engagé
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ahn-gah-ZHAY\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: committed to or supportive of a cause
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Our next-door neighbor Michael, an engagé environmental activist, uses solar power to heat his home and drives a hybrid automobile.

“George MacDonald was a Scottish Congregationalist who pastored an English Congregationalist chapel for a while, drifted away into freelance preaching, but stayed true to his desire to bring an engagé Christianity to workers stuck in the industrial heartland.” — From Valentine Cunningham's 2011 book Victorian Poetry Now

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Engagé” is the past participle of the French verb “engager,” meaning “to engage.” The French have used “engagé” since the 19th century to describe socially or politically active people. The term became particularly fashionable in the wake of World War II, when French writers, artists, and intellectuals felt it was increasingly important for them to take a stand on political or social issues and represent their attitudes in their art. By 1946, English speakers had adopted the word for their own politically relevant writing or art, and within a short time “engagé” was being used generally for any passionate commitment to a cause.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Gonzaga’s Homeless Camp?

 

Good morning, Netizens…

 

It just goes to show you where everyone's priorities are. According to the talking heads of the local news organizations, Gonzaga students who were temporarily staying in the “tent city” in front of the Kennel in preparation for the big game with Brigham Young University coming up tomorrow night were told they could not stay in their tents until 7:00 AM this morning due to the cold weather.

 

Meanwhile in other areas of our Fair City, the warming centers set aside for the homeless have not been opened. Say, now there's an idea waiting to happen. The former tent city which was created by the homeless beneath the freeway was closed and its tents removed because they were in violation of city laws. An enterprising homeless person could set up a tent in front of the Kennel and probably could get away with it so long as they could convince anyone they were Gonzaga students.

 

Providing it is after 7:00 AM, that is.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— fanfaronade

Good morning, Netizens…

January 23, 2013

Words of the Day

  • fanfaronade
  • audio pronunciation
  • \fan-fair-uh-NAYD\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: empty boasting : bluster
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Having grown weary of the former governor's fanfaronade and lack of concrete action, voters sent a clear message at the polls and elected his opponent by a landslide.

“I don't intend this as an article about how to divorce oneself from conceit, narcissism and fanfaronade….” — From an article by Phil Guarnieri in the Floral Park Dispatch (New York), August 10, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

If we tell you that fanfaronade is what fanfarons do, you'll easily guess that “fanfaron” means “braggart.” Both “fanfaron” (a fairly uncommon word found in unabridged dictionaries) and “fanfaronade” derive from “fanfarrón,” a Spanish word for a boaster that probably developed in imitation of the verbal claptrap blared by blowhards. “Fanfarrón” gave Spanish speakers “fanfarronada,” which the French borrowed with the spelling “fanfaronnade”; English speakers further modified the French term into “fanfaronade” in the mid-1600s. Some etymologists believe English speakers borrowed “fanfaron” directly from Spanish, but others think that word also passed through French before reaching our language. It isn't clear whether “fanfaron” and “fanfaronade” are directly related to the similar “fanfare” or if that term arose as yet another transliteration of the sound of a showy or pompous display.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— euchre

Good morning, Netizens…

January 22, 2013

Words of the Day

  • euchre
  • audio pronunciation
  • \YOO-ker\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to prevent from winning three tricks in the card game euchre
2
: to cheat or trick
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“'You fooled us good,' Frank confessed. 'After Northfield, Jesse knew we'd been euchred somehow. But I wouldn't have suspected you in a thousand years.'” — From Matt Braun's 2008 novel Manhunter / Deadwood

“He'd never held a pick or shovel in those waxy white hands. His principal business was euchring anyone who was sucker enough to do business with him.” — From Richard S. Wheeler's 2005 novel Seven Miles to Sundown

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

Euchre is a card game for four players that is played in tricks, or rounds, with a deck of 32 cards. Etymologists aren't sure where we got the name for the game, though they do know that it first appeared in English in the mid-19th century. The first sense of the verb “euchre” arose from an action that takes place during the game: a player is “euchred” when an opponent blocks him or her from winning three or more tricks after making trump. Deception can often be key to a winning strategy, and sure enough it took almost no time at all for “euchre” to develop a sense meaning “cheat” or “trick.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— zarzuela

Good morning, Netizens…

January 21, 2013

Words of the Day

  • zarzuela
  • audio pronunciation
  • \zahr-ZWAY-luh\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a usually comic Spanish operetta
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“The first major trip was leaving Spain, with my sister and our aunt, to travel by ship to Mexico, where my parents had set up their own zarzuela company.” — From an interview with Placido Domingo in the Chicago Tribune, October 14, 2012

“In Napa, Calif., the Jarvis Conservatory presents one or two zarzuelas during the month of June and produces the only DVD of zarzuelas.” — From an article by Alicia Garcia Clark in The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, October 23, 2006

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Zarzuela” is connected with the Spanish opera La Zarzuela, which entranced audiences with its different vocal and musical styles. The word toured into English in the 18th century. Alfred Einstein (the musicologist cousin of Albert) assisted in its establishment in the language by including it in his 1947 work Music in the Romantic Era. More recently, the word has begun to appear on the Spanish culinary stage as a term for a rich and savory seafood dish. A couple of the specific entrées that have emerged are the piebald “zarzuela de maiscos,” a mixture of seafood, and the “zarzuela de pescados,” a potpourri of fish.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#VEQAJQxo7Y8ur4d0.99

Words of the Day— preen

Good morning, Netizens…

January 20, 2013

Words of the Day

  • preen
  • audio pronunciation
  • \PREEN\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to groom with the bill
2
: to dress or smooth up : primp
3
: to pride or congratulate (oneself) on an achievement : to behave or speak with obvious pride or self-satisfaction
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Even though he was particularly thrilled about the promotion, Jeff tried hard not to preen in front of his coworkers.

“Both birds seem to be in very good condition. They will perch on a branch and preen themselves after some of their work periods.” — From an article by Bud Simpson in The Logan Daily News, November 23, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

The incubation of “preen” began in 14th-century Middle English with the spelling “prenen,” which can itself be traced to the Anglo-French forms “pur-,” meaning “thoroughly,” and “uindre” or “oindre,” meaning “to anoint or rub.” One of the first writers to apply “preen” to the human act of primping was Geoffrey Chaucer in The Canterbury Tales. It took a long time—around 500 years—for the prideful meaning of “preen” to hatch, but another bird-related word, “plume,” was available for use with the meaning “to pride or congratulate (oneself)” from the first half of the 17th century.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/2013/01/20/#koK7SlZB0VRcBuRs.99

Words of the Day— mentor

January 19, 2013

Words of the Day

  • mentor
  • audio pronunciation
  • \MEN-tor\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: a trusted counselor or guide
2
: tutor, coach
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The young man regarded the professor not only as a mentor, but as a good friend as well.

“Every time a Strong Women Strong Girls (SWSG) group from Point Park speaks to an after-school program full of elementary school girls, they introduce them to a positive female role model in society. Every time, they encourage going to college. Every time, both young girls and mentors end up laughing. And every time, the girls have a hard time saying goodbye.” — From an article by Marina Weiss in The Globe (Point Park University, Pennsylvania), December 4, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

We acquired “mentor” from the literature of ancient Greece. In Homer's epic The Odyssey, Odysseus was away from home fighting and journeying for 20 years. During that time, Telemachus, the son he left as a babe in arms, grew up under the supervision of Mentor, an old and trusted friend. When the goddess Athena decided it was time to complete the education of young Telemachus, she visited him disguised as Mentor and they set out together to learn about his father. Today, we use the word “mentor” for anyone who is a positive, guiding influence in another (usually younger) person's life.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#KKTEKt3EIb4IG7zE.99

Words of the Day— traduce

Good morning, Netizens…

January 18, 2013

Word of the Day

  • traduce
  • audio pronunciation
  • \truh-DOOSS\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to expose to shame or blame by means of falsehood and misrepresentation
2
: violate, betray
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

At the apex of the journalist's career, a jealous rival attempted to traduce her name with false allegations.

“In his introductory remarks, Stuart Proffitt, publishing director of Penguin Press and chairman of the prize committee, praised the BBC as the greatest cultural institution in the history of the world…. Here, at last, was someone prepared publicly to speak up for the BBC when so many others were seeking to traduce and destroy it.” — From an article by Jason Cowley in New Statesman, November 19, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Traduce” is one of a number of English synonyms that you can choose when you need a word that means “to injure by speaking ill of.” Choose “traduce” when you want to stress the deep personal humiliation, disgrace, and distress felt by the victim. If someone doesn't actually lie, but makes statements that injure by specific and often subtle misrepresentations, “malign” may be the more precise choice. To make it clear that the speaker is malicious and the statements made are false, “calumniate” is a good option. But if you need to say that certain statements represent an attempt to destroy a reputation by open and direct abuse, “vilify” is the word you want.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#AwTHxBd3P32aQtt2.99

Words of the Day— vernissage

January 17, 2013

Words of the Day

  • vernissage
  • audio pronunciation
  • \vair-nih-SAHZH\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a private showing or preview of an art exhibition
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Before the art auction, there will be a vernissage during which people can mingle with the artists and preview their work.

“Art Basel officially opens with its vernissage Nov. 30 and runs through Dec. 4, but Miami Art Week—as it is being called—sprawls across the calendar with events from Nov. 27 on, basically Sunday to Sunday.” — From an article by Beth Dunlop in The Miami Herald, September 18, 2011

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Vernissage” has its roots in the old practice of setting aside a day before an exhibition's opening for artists to varnish and put finishing touches to their paintings—a tradition that reportedly dates to at least 1809, when it was instituted by England's Royal Academy of Arts. (One famous member of the Academy, Joseph Mallord William Turner, was notorious for making major changes to his paintings on this day.) English speakers originally referred to this day of finishing touches simply as “varnishing day,” but sometime around 1912 we also began using the French term “vernissage” (literally, “varnishing”). Today, however, you are more likely to encounter vino than varnish at a vernissage, which is often a gala event marking the opening of an exhibition.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/2013/01/17/#xXBQzf5IqJTlWTgL.99

Former Acting Chief Stephens…

 

Good afternoon, Netizens…

 

There is a fair hue and cry about town over the former Acting Police Chief Scott Stephens being demoted from sitting atop the throne of the Spokane Police Department, to losing that position to banishing him entirely from the upper ranks of the rank and filed. Chief Straub was brought into play purportedly on the to rebuild the public's trust in the police department, but now the best answers we can seemingly find to what happened with regard to Scott Stephens is in the words of the Public Motormouth for the Spokane Police Department are a terse no comment. Everything else is silence. Trust is not built on the basis of no-comment and the absolute lack of details about the demotion of Scott Stevens. I originally would have hoped better of Dr. Straub.

 

Could it just maybe be that we have a chameleon in City Hall? Which was the chameleon, one may ask. It could be Chief Straub for his lack of accountability. It could be our Mayor for his lack of transparency. Or it could be former Acting Chief Scott Stevens for his lack of taking action on the guerilla salutes to Klubber Karl by officers during his trial.

 

Everyone seems to be ducking and running for cover behind this is a personnel issue. My bare foot! We just have to wait and see what color the chameleon will turn up next.

 

Your opinions, of course, may differ.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— inchmeal

Good morning, Netizens,..,

January 16, 2013

Words of the Day

  • inchmeal
  • audio pronunciation
  • \INCH-meel\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adverb

: little-by-little, gradually
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The fog that had been concentrated over the valley dissipated inchmeal, revealing a quiet busyness in the small village below.

“I glanced at my Luminox wristwatch. The glowing dial showed 6:10…. Light came inchmeal, like torture. Another flock [of ducks] blew like rocket chaff across the gray-black sky. I sneaked another peek. 6:20.” — From an article by Joe Doggett in The Houston Chronicle, December 19, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“All the infections that the sun sucks up / From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper fall, and make him / By inch-meal a disease!” So goes one of the curses the hated and hateful Caliban hurls in the direction of Prospero in Shakespeare's The Tempest. The origin of “inchmeal” is simple; the “inch” half is the familiar measurement, and the “meal” is the suffix we know from the more common word “piecemeal” (which shares the “gradually” meaning of “inchmeal,” and has several other meanings as well). “Meal” is an old suffix that means “by a (specified) portion or measure at a time”; it is related to the modern German word “mal,” meaning “time,” as in the German word “manchmal,” meaning “sometimes.”

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#MpdqBIJDS9lzSXD7.99

Words of the Day— taradiddle

Good morning, Netizens…

January 14, 2013

Word of the Day

  • taradiddle
  • audio pronunciation
  • \tair-uh-DID-ul\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: a trivial or childish lie : fib
2
: pretentious nonsense
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“Even parents with the very best of intentions find themselves telling taradiddles to their offspring.” — From a blog post by Ben Schott at nytimes.com, November 12, 2010

“As truths go, the history of Miss Rossiter she had laid out was unimpressive: a forked-tongue taraddidle of the highest order and if I were to serve it up to Hardy and be found out afterwards I should be lucky to escape arrest, if not a smack on the legs with a hairbrush for the cheek of it.” — From Catriona McPherson's 2009 novel Danny Gilver and the Proper Treatment of Bloodstains

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

The true origin of “taradiddle” is unknown, but that doesn't mean you won't encounter a lot of balderdash about its history. Some folks try to connect it to the verb “diddle” (meaning “to cheat”), but that hasn’t been proven and may turn out to be poppycock. You may hear some tommyrot about it coming from the Old English verb “didrian,” which meant “to deceive,” but that couldn’t be true unless “didrian” was somehow suddenly revived after eight or nine centuries of disuse. No one even knows when “taradiddle” was first used. It must have been long before it showed up in a 1796 dictionary of colloquial speech (where it was defined as a synonym of “fib”), but if we claimed we knew who said it first, we’d be dishing out pure applesauce.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#epKAwG8KLXo3H6pc.99

Oscar the Oven Mitt

I love names. I give names to everything – my car, my cat, my kids, spiders, clothes, and oven mitts. Actually, it’s my Mom’s doing. She started it. 

When we were growing up, Mom acquired an oven mitt in the shape of an alligator (or a crocodile – I can’t tell them apart), and we were fascinated with “him.” We worried endlessly about how he would survive going into the hot oven to grab something with his teeth. Mom named him Oscar. Oscar was like a Mighty Crock who could withstand innumerous dunkings into the fires of hell, er, the oven. He was singed, and once even caught fire upon which my Dad heroically put out the fire by throwing Oscar into the dishwater and nearly drowning him. Once he actually made it into the laundry and all the little singed parts became little frayed holes. But he still managed to be the chief pot holder in the family, and the only one with a name.
 
We had a George, too, who was really all our hoodies for camping – only they weren’t called hoodies back in the cold age of camp fires, marshmallows, and ghost stories. They were plain old sweatshirts with hoods and pockets in the front. We each had an identical shirt and they were only used for camping – so at the end of the summer, Mom would make a show of putting the smallest hoodie into the next hoodie, into the next, until finally Dad’s sweatshirt was enveloping the whole family of hoodies. It looked like a torso and sat in the back of the closet. She named him George.
 
This was handy other times of the year because if we heard creeks or groans from the house, we all chalked it up to … … George. 
 
And of course, spiders have names. According to my mother. They are all Fred. Fred lives outside – at least that is where he belongs. So she carefully picks Fred up with a tissue and puts him outside where he belongs. All of my siblings and I learned this very valuable skill very early in our lives. Spiders – all named Fred – belong outside as God intended.
 
However, if the spider happens to be a Black Widow – then all rules about Fred go right out the window – I mean to say – the Black Widow doesn’t get the same privileges as Fred. The Black Widow is killed by Mom at least 150 times until she is absolutely positive that there is no more Black Widow at all, not a single molecule. 
 
So – I was dating a guy I considered pretty macho and we were sitting on the couch watching a movie when a centipede started marching along the wall behind the television. I thought nothing of it – a cousin of Fred – and grabbed a tissue and gently lifted the centipede and put “her” outside where she belonged. I turned back and here is macho man, with his knees up to his chest, looking like some monster had slithered along the floor under his feet. What? You don’t put your little critters out where they belong?
 
Anyway – Oscar grew old and frayed and finally was relegated to the back of the drawer of old towels and cleaning rags – the nursing home of oven mitts. I still put Fred out where he belongs.
 
[posted from 2009 http://www.jeaniespokane.blogspot.com/]

~So, do you name your potholders???~

~Jeanie~

Words of the Day— realia

Good morning, Netizens…

January 11, 2013

Word of the Day

  • realia
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ree-AL-ee-uh\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun plural

: objects or activities used to relate classroom teaching to the real life especially of peoples studied
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Among the realia used for the class's lesson on World War II was a helmet and canteen that had belonged to one student’s great-grandfather.

“It's common knowledge that eighth grade is one of life's low points. Here, it literally makes Ginny Davis sick. Photo-collages of poems, notes, text and chat messages, comics, realia of all sorts and, especially, food document the descent of Ginny's school year.” — From a book review in Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Realia,” as defined above, was first used in the late 19th century, and is still mostly used in the classroom by teachers, especially foreign language teachers. It is also used in library cataloguing (in reference to such bizarre things as an author's hair and teeth donated posthumously) and occasionally finds its way into other contexts as well. You might, for example, hear of someone putting “realia”—objects that represent present-day life—in a time capsule. “Realia” is also sometimes used philosophically to distinguish real things from the theories about them—a meaning that dates to the early 19th century. “Realia” is one of those plural formations without a corresponding singular form. Like “memorabilia” (“memorable things” or “mementos”), “juvenilia” (“works produced in an artist's or author's youth”), and “marginalia” (“marginal notes or embellishments”), it incorporates the Latin plural ending ”-ia.”

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#VWZJ70ECgMYcY0z4.99

A Word A Day — Apollonian

Good morning, Netizens…

January 10, 2013

Word of the Day

  • Apollonian
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ap-uh-LOH-nee-un\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

1
: of, relating to, or resembling the god Apollo
2
: harmonious, measured, ordered, or balanced in character
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

His paintings exhibit a stately and Apollonian elegance, but too often fail to engage the viewer emotionally.

“[Pianist Andras] Schiff is described as cool, Apollonian, restrained, though this could be as much about his serene appearance than about the actual sound of the instrument.” — From a review by Anne Midgette in The Washington Post, October 28, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

To the ancient Greeks, Apollo represented the perfection of youthful manhood. He was the god of music, poetry, archery, prophecy, and healing, among other things. English speakers began using the adjective “Apollonian” for someone who resembled Apollo in physical beauty or talent as long ago as 1663. Due partly to the work of Nietzsche and other German scholars, we now associate Apollo with the forces of calm rationality (as opposed to the “Dionysian” forces, which are instinctive, frenzied, and uninhibited). Despite these associations, Apollo himself was not always a force of reason—he had a terrible temper and a lust for young girls as well.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the Day — buttonhole

Good morning, Netizens…

January 09, 2013

Words of the Day

  • buttonhole
  • audio pronunciation
  • \BUT-un-hohl\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

: to detain in conversation by or as if by holding on to the outer garments of
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

I'm sorry I'm late. I was buttonholed by a coworker just as I was leaving my office.

“The school's administrative assistant, Kristine Silva, who attended Jefferson when she was a little girl, made a Facebook event that attracted about 9,000 people. And she buttonholed anyone she encountered who happened to be carrying a smartphone, including store clerks and a stranger in a food court in an Albuquerque mall.” — From an article by Leslie Linthicum in the Albuquerque Journal, November 22, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Buttonhole” is easy to pin down as a noun referring to the slit or loop through which a button is passed to fasten something, but its shift to a verb meaning “to detain in conversation” requires some explanation. “Buttonhole” is an alteration of another verb now long out of use: “buttonhold,” which literally meant to hold on to the buttons or lapels of someone's coat when speaking to him or her. In the mid-19th century, English speakers altered the verb to “buttonhole,” perhaps as a result of hearing “buttonhold” as “buttonholed.” The overlap is apparent in an early instance of this spelling, an 1862 London publication called All Year Round: “The man who is button~holed, or held … and must listen to half an hour's harangue about nothing interesting.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Word of the Day — ramify

Good evening, Netizens…

January 08, 2013

Word of the Day

  • ramify
  • audio pronunciation
  • \RAM-uh-fye\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to split up into branches or constituent parts
2
: to send forth branches or extensions
3
: to cause to branch
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“The people of Rafadh had decisions to make, ones that might soon ramify across all of Yemen's remote mountains and deserts and even half a world away in the Pentagon.” — From an article by Robert F. Worth in the New York Times Magazine, July 6, 2010

“And most of these stories aren't over yet. They'll ripple and ramify for years to come, in ways that are destined to both shock and gratify us.” — From a review by Armin Rosen of the top international news stories of 2012, in the Atlantic, December 7, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Ramify” has been part of English since the 15th century and is an offshoot of the Latin word for “branch,” which is “ramus.” English acquired several scientific words from “ramus,” including “biramous” (“having two branches”). Another English word derived from “ramus” is the now obsolete “ramage,” meaning “untamed” or “wild.” “Ramage” originated in falconry—it was initially used of young hawks that had begun to fly from branch to branch in trees. “Ramify” started out as a scientific word, at first referring to branching parts of plants and trees and later to veins and nerves, but it soon branched out into non-scientific and even figurative uses, as in “ideas that ramify throughout society.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — pedagogical

January 07, 2013

Word of the Day

  • pedagogical
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ped-uh-GAH-jih-kul\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: of, relating to, or befitting a teacher or education
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

New teachers will be evaluated on pedagogical skills such as lesson planning and classroom management.

“The report suggests that the exam be multidimensional and include subject knowledge as well as pedagogical knowledge. In other words, in addition to having to know the subject they teach, teachers would have to demonstrate that they had the qualities to be 'caring, competent and confident.'” — From an article by Donna Krache at CNN's Schools of Thought blog, December 4, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Pedagogical,” which has the somewhat less common spelling variant “pedagogic,” was coined in the early 17th century from a Greek adjective of the same meaning. That adjective, “paidagōgikos,” in turn derives from the noun “paidagōgos,” meaning “teacher.” The English word “pedagogue” (which can simply mean “teacher” but usually suggests one who is particularly dull) derives from the same root. Though the words “educational” and “teacher” make the grade in most contexts, “pedagogical” and “pedagogue” are useful additions to the class.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#R0zZlDYIYsji70Rh.99

A Word A Day — quintessence

January 06, 2013

Word of the Day

  • quintessence
  • audio pronunciation
  • \kwin-TESS-unss\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: the essence of a thing in its purest and most concentrated form
2
: the most typical example or representative
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Roasting marshmallows over an open fire is the quintessence of the camping experience.

“A seven-minute cartoon … containing the quintessence of frustration and despair, Froggy features a construction worker whose sanity begins to unravel when he discovers an ebullient performing frog that he might make a fortune from—if it didn't turn taciturn and morose the moment anyone else is watching.” — From an article by Nick Pinkerton in The Village Voice, November 20, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

Long ago, when people believed that the earth was made up of four elements—earth, air, fire, and water—they thought the stars and planets were made up of yet another element. In the Middle Ages, people called this element by its Medieval Latin name, “quinta essentia,” literally, “fifth essence.” Our forebears believed the quinta essentia was essential to all kinds of matter, and if they could somehow isolate it, it would cure all disease. We have since given up on that idea, but we kept “quintessence,” the offspring of “quinta essentia,” as a word for the purest essence of a thing. Some modern physicists have given “quintessence” a new twist—they use it for a form of so-called “dark energy,” which is believed to make up 70 percent of the universe.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

It was NOT a heart attack!

Good morning, Netizens…

 

Good morning, Netizens…

 

Well, between Jeanie and I, we have been collectively wracking up our frequent flier miles with the health care system during the last six months, and to be honest about it, I am certain neither of us are having much fun, as the confusion simply mounts up each time we attempt to interact with the health care system. My experience(s) last Thursday night, largely a case of mistaken identification, caused me to spend time overnight with Holy Fumbling's Emergency Room and an overnight stay, and while it was, at times frustrating, at least diagnostically-functional.

 

My experiences all began with chest pain, something I should be sensitive to after having had three heart attacks, albeit nearly ten years ago. Conditioned as I am from those experiences, my wife and I went forthwith to the ER and reported my chest pain which, in the parlance of the medical community was “a high six on a scale of one to ten”, in short, it hurt badly, but I've had a lot worse in the past.

 

Fast forward to the cat scan, which to me was almost as bad as the pains themselves. When they designed the cat scan machine, it positions the patient to where one is looking directly into the overhead light fixture. Since I do tend to suffer from claustrophobia, the combination of the light and the tight quarters of the cat scan machine made me nauseous. After over 24 hours of chemical and other diagnostic testing, it was judged that my heart was fine, with no enzymes or other signs of cardiac difficulty other than my usual heart murmur, I think I finally got to the bottom of my chest pain issue.

 

According to the cat scan, I have gallstones, which they could see in the cat scan. After consulting with various online sources, I have found gallstones can hurt nearly as badly as a heart attack. Well, here I am 48 hours later, much wiser for being admitted to the hospital, and once more being functional at 100% for an aging fatbody of 67 years of age. Since gall bladder issues tend to be hereditary, and since my son had his gall bladder removed after having experienced pains, I guess I have to take that into consideration in the future.

 

Given the fact that the entire time I was in the ER I couldn't help but hear a constant round of coughing, wheezing and general discomfort from patients waiting for treatment for the flu, when the nurse offered me a flu shot and pneumonia shot, I didn't give them any grief. I had already been exposed to one or both simply being in the Emergency Room and thus was probably a safe bet.

 

My God, my body is failing me, but my brain continues to function. Now all we have to do is wait for the billing procedure to see how well my health insurance works now under Medicare. That might be mind-boggling in and of itself.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — imperturbable

Good morning Netizens…

January 05, 2013

Word of the Day

  • imperturbable
  • audio pronunciation
  • \im-per-TER-buh-bul\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: marked by extreme calm, impassivity, and steadiness : serene
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The imperturbable pilot did not panic when her plane flew into an electrical storm.

“But ZZ Top has always excelled when it lets notes growl and grooves simmer, relaxing rather than rushing, and maintaining a laid-back musical cool to parallel its imperturbable attitude.” — From a review by Bob Gendron in the Chicago Tribune, October 12, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

There is an interesting time lag between the appearance of “imperturbable” and its antonym, “perturbable.” Although “imperturbable” is known to have existed since the middle of the 15th century, “perturbable” didn't show up in written English until 1800. The verb “perturb” (meaning “to disquiet” or “to throw into confusion”) predates both “imperturbable” and “perturbable”; it has been part of English since the 14th century. All three words derive from Latin “perturbare” (also meaning “to throw into confusion”), which in turn comes from the combination of “per-” and “turbare,” which means “to disturb.” Other relatives of “imperturbable” include “disturb” and “turbid.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

To Vaccinate or Not

Recently, Yahoo reported on nurses being fired at an Indiana hospital for refusing to get vaccinated.  (http://news.yahoo.com/nurses-fired-refusing-flu-shot-224637902—abc-news-health.html)

I am in a position where I depend on my care givers to get vaccinated for the flu.  I think that all care givers in hospitals and doctors' offices and clinics should get the flu vaccine - to protect their patients.  I recently got the whooping cough booster to safeguard my new grandchildren.

Several years ago, I helped care for Mechanic Man's grandmother in a nursing home here in Spokane.  After almost three years there, an aid came in with the flu instead of staying home (now THAT would be a novel idea as opposed to getting vaccinated).   Grandma got the flu within a couple days, vomited down her face and neck causing severe burns from the acid.  She also lost her ability to swallow.  So - she starved to death because someone didn't get vaccinated.

I think firing is a little over the top - but I also think that if you are in the health care field, you need to get vaccinated.

imho ~ Jeanie ~

A Word A Day — doctrine of signatures

Good morning, Netizens…

January 04, 2013

Word of the Day

  • doctrine of signatures
  • audio pronunciation
  • \DAHK-trun-uv-SIG-nuh-cherz\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a theory in old natural philosophy: the outward appearance of a body signals its special properties (as of magic or healing virtue) and there is a relationship between the outward qualities of a medicinal object and the diseases against which it is effective
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Among the documents are the notes of a 17th-century physician, who discusses his use of the doctrine of signatures to determine which medicinal plants to use for which ailments.

“Lungwort (Pulmonaria) is legacy from the ancient doctrine of signatures, which included a belief that a plant resembling a part of the anatomy had medicinal properties for that part. The broad, elongated white-spotted leaves of this plant were thought to resemble the lung and used to treat pulmonary ailments.” — From an article by Julie Finucane in The Argus-Press (Owosso, Michigan), November 12, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

The idea that a plant's appearance might give clues to its healing capacities is an old one (it was advocated by the Roman scholar Pliny the Elder). The word “signature” (from Latin “signare,” meaning “to sign or mark”) has been used to refer to a plant feature that suggests its potential medicinal value since the 1600s. For instance, bloodroot, with its red sap, was considered effective against blood disorders, and liverwort, which has a three-lobed leaf that resembles the liver, was used to treat—you guessed it—liver diseases. Many examples of the variety of herbal medicine espoused by the doctrine of signatures can be found in Nicholas Culpeper's pseudo-scientific A Physicall Directory, published in 1649.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — festoon

Good morning Netizens…

January 03, 2013

Word of the Day

  • festoon
  • audio pronunciation
  • \fess-TOON\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: a decorative chain or strip hanging between two points
2
: a carved, molded, or painted ornament representing a decorative chain
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Festoons of colored paper were draped along the classroom's walls.

“Imagine how the parlor was created and decorated, and note the bright azalea color of the silk drapery with festoons lined in an apple green.” — From an article by Carleton Varney in the Palm Beach Daily News, March 23, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Festoon” can also be a verb that is used as a synonym of “decorate” or “adorn” (as in “the room was festooned with streamers and balloons”). The verb “festoon,” which first appeared in the late 1700s, comes from the noun “festoon,” which appeared over 100 years earlier. “Festoon” traces back (by way of French and Italian) to Latin “festa,” the plural of “festum,” meaning “festival.” “Festa” is also an ancestor of the English noun “feast.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — heliacal

Good morning, Netizens…

January 02, 2013

Word of the Day

  • heliacal
  • audio pronunciation
  • \hih-LYE-uh-kul\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: relating to or near the sun — used especially of the last setting of a star before and its first rising after invisibility due to conjunction with the sun's rising and setting
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The heliacal rising of Pleiades marked the beginning of summer in the old Julian calendar, which was introduced by Julius Caesar.

“Nowadays, if you wish to watch the heliacal rising of Sirius, you've got to wait until August. This is because Earth wobbles on its axis … and over several millennia, the positions of celestial objects shift slightly.” — From an article by Dennis Mammana in Newsday (New York), July 14, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

The word “heliacal” rose in the mid-16th century. Its source is the Greek word “hēlios,” meaning “sun.” Helios is also the Sun god of ancient Greece. “Heliacal” often suggests a relationship between a star and the sun as they appear to the human eye in the sky, as in our example sentences. It's also used in reference to the ancient Egyptian year, which began on the date when Sirius (or the Dog Star) first appeared on the eastern horizon at sunrise. English speakers have referred to this year as the heliacal year or the Sothic year. (“Sothic” comes from “Sōthōs,” the Greek word for Sirius.)

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

No Resolution Necessary

The New Year has arrived!!!  Hallelujah!  I can honestly say, for 2012, Thank God That’s Over.  And I mean, I pray thanks to God that this year is over.

Not that I’ve had a bad year, mind you, but I believe I have walked through the Valley of the Shadow of Death.  And true to His Word, God was with me the whole time.  I came out of that walk with a new purpose. 

I started having severe health problems in June – ending up with two separate (but identical) bacterial staph infections of my heart.  In between these very serious, life-threatening illnesses, I got well enough to have my over-grown kidneys removed (and the one little cancerous cell, to boot).
 
After six weeks of recuperating from surgery, the second staph infection attacked, damaging a little hole in my heart.  I ended up having open heart surgery to patch that hole and to clean up bacteria that had settled on one of my heart valves. 
 
I think it’s possible that everything that happens to us, happens for a reason – a gift, a lesson, a blessing, something positive.  I have a new attitude – and that is an attitude of gratitude.  I am thankful that everything happened because it changed me.  I am kinder to friends and strangers.  I am patient with people who struggle with little things (like the lady in front of me at the store, fumbling with no success to get her receipt and cash and change back in the appropriate places in her purse – mainly because I know that I am the next lady in line that is going to be doing that same finger dance until I am so frustrated that I just toss the whole wad into my purse knowing that the next time I have to pay for something, I’ll have to wrestle wrinkled receipts, twisted dollars, and loose change before I get to my wallet).  I talk to God more.  I ask when I need help.  I am thankful for the help I receive.  And I praise God for being so awesome.
 
Bring on the new year!  I have no resolutions to make.  They were made for me by circumstances beyond my control.  I came out of the shadow of death and feel like I’m standing on top of a mountain.
 
So, bring on the new year and whatever roller-coaster ride it becomes!  I’m on it!
 
~Jeanie~

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

 

Good morning, Netizens…

 

Well, I've turned 67 years of age yesterday, and although I have answered less than half of the congratulations, I feel I have done more than my fair share of being responsible to everyone.

However, since I cannot sleep for all the booming of fireworks both public and private going off I might as well take the time to wish everyone a Happy and Prosperous New Year. I probably should take note that, in addition to the usual semi-deceptive osculation going on in various places to celebrate the New Year, several gay and lesbian couples were sharing spit on nationwide television.

But now the fireworks are over and the fog appears to be rolling in, me and my spouse are going to turn in for the night. Much love to you all.

 

Dave

A Word A Day — hark back

Good morning, Netizens…

January 01, 2013

Word of the Day

  • hark back
  • audio pronunciation
  • \HAHRK-BAK\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to turn back to an earlier topic or circumstance
2
: to go back to something as an origin or source
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The restaurant's art deco interior harks back to Paris in the 1920s.

“The design features the city's iconic Spanish-style entryway, a large mission bell and two oxen pulling a bountiful cart of grapes, harking back to the days when the mission was known to produce wine.” — From an article by Rosanna Xia in the Los Angeles Times, November 23, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Hark,” a very old word meaning “listen,” was used as a cry in hunting. The master of the hunt might cry “Hark! Forward!” or “Hark! Back!” The cries became set phrases, both as nouns and verbs. Thus, a “hark back” was a retracing of a route by dogs and hunters, and “to hark back” was to turn back along the path. From its use in hunting, the verb soon acquired its current figurative meanings. In the early 20th century, English speakers began using “hearken back” and its variant “harken back” synonymously with the verb “hark back.” (Like “hark,” “hearken” and “harken” can mean “listen.”) And since the 1980s, there's been another development: “harken” can now be used alone to mean “hark back.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Get blog updates by email

About this blog

Spokesman-Review readers blog about news and issues in Spokane.

Latest comments »

Read all the posts from recent conversations on Community Comment.

Search this blog
Subscribe to this blog
ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here