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Community Comment

Archive for July 2013

A Word A Day — fungible

 

Good afternoon Netizens…

 

July 13, 2013

Word of the Day

  • fungible

  • audio pronunciation

  • \FUN-juh-bul\

  • DEFINITION

  •  

adjective

1

: being of such a nature that one part or quantity may be replaced by another equal part or quantity in the satisfaction of an obligation

2

: interchangeable

3

: flexible

  • EXAMPLES

  •  

Since fruits and vegetables are regarded as fungible in this diet, you are allowed a total of five servings of either or both.

“Oil is a fungible commodity and its prices are determined in the global market.” — From an article by Gal Luft in The Wichita Eagle (Kansas), May 30, 2013

  • DID YOU KNOW?

  •  

“Fungible”—which derives from the Latin verb “fungi,” meaning “to perform” (no relation to the noun “fungus” and its plural “fungi”)—is a word that often shows up in legal and political contexts. Something fungible can be exchanged for something else of the same kind. For example, when we say “oil is a fungible commodity,” we mean that when a purchaser is expecting a delivery of oil, any oil of the stipulated quantity and quality will usually do. Another example of something fungible is cash. It doesn't matter what twenty dollar bill you get — it's still worth the same amount as any other twenty dollar bill. In contrast, something like a painting isn't fungible; a purchaser would expect a specific, identifiable item to be delivered. In broader use, “fungible” can mean “interchangeable” or sometimes “changeable, fluid, or malleable.”

Dave

A Word A Day — thwart

 

Good morning Netizens…

July 12, 2013

  • thwart

  • audio pronunciation

  • \THWORT\

  • DEFINITION

  •  

verb

1

a : to run counter to so as to effectively oppose or baffle b : to oppose successfully : defeat the hopes or aspirations of

2

: to pass through or across

  • EXAMPLES

  •  

At the end of the episode, the fleeing villain told the hero, “You may have thwarted me this time, but I'll be back.”

“But the union and its parent organization, the American Federation of Teachers Massachusetts, are also trying to thwart the Lawrence turnaround plan legislatively.” — From an editorial in the Boston Globe, May 29, 2013

  • DID YOU KNOW?

  •  

“Thwart” and its synonyms “foil” and “frustrate” all suggest checking or defeating another's plan or preventing the achievement of a goal. “Foil” implies checking or defeating so as to discourage future efforts (“foiled by her parents, he stopped trying to see her”), while “frustrate” suggests making all efforts, however vigorous or persistent, futile or ineffectual (“frustrated attempts at government reform”). “Thwart” usually indicates frustration caused by opposition (“the army thwarted an attempted coup”).


  

Dave

Jumping tall buildings..,,

 

Good morning Netizens…

 

I have been absent without leave for some time now, partially because my health hasn't been up to the standards set by Clark Kent during his brief sojourn as a journalist while leaping over tall buildings. In fact, I'm still trying to figure out if there is anyone with the temerity or skill to run this pop stand were I to expire and end up dancing in the Virtual Ballroom as a ghost.

 

But I am on my way to better health, but I will not be leaping any tall buildings.

 

Dave

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