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Posts tagged: Words of the day

Words of the day — clepsydra

Good evening Netizens…

March 01, 2013

Word of the Day

  • clepsydra
  • audio pronunciation
  • \KLEP-suh-druh\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: an instrument designed to measure time by the fall or flow of a quantity of water : water clock
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The ancient Greeks were known to time political speeches with a clepsydra; when the water was gone, the oration was over.

“One of the earliest mechanisms to measure time … was a clepsydra or water clock … in which a vessel either filled or emptied at some slow, regular rate….” — From an article by David W. Ball in Spectroscopy, December 2006

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

In ancient times the sun was used to measure time during the day, but sundials weren't much help after dark, so peoples around the world invented clocks that used dripping water to mark the hours. In one kind of water clock, possibly invented by the Chaldeans, a vessel was filled with water that was allowed to escape through a hole. The vessel's inside was marked with graduated lines, and the time was read by measuring the level of the remaining water. The ancient Greeks called their water clocks “klepsydra” (“water thief”), which comes from “kleptein” (“to steal”) and “hydōr” (“water”). English speakers stole “clepsydra” from the Greeks in the 16th century. Actual water clocks have become increasingly rare and we now use the word primarily in historical references.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — expunge

Good evening Netizens…

February 27, 2013

Word of the Day

  • expunge
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ix-SPUNJ\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to strike out, obliterate, or mark for deletion
2
: to efface completely : destroy
3
: to eliminate (as a memory) from one's consciousness
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Time and the forces of nature have expunged any evidence that a thriving community once existed in that location.

“Eligible veterans can avoid jail time or get their charges expunged if they complete an intensive treatment and rehabilitation program.” — From an article by Tracie Mauriello and Anya Sostek in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 22, 2012

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In medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, a series of dots was used to mark mistakes or to label material that should be deleted from a text, and those deletion dots can help you remember the history of “expunge.” They were known as “puncta delentia.” The “puncta” part of the name derives from the Latin verb “pungere,” which can be translated as “to prick or sting” (and you can imagine that a scribe may have felt stung when his mistakes were so punctuated in a manuscript). “Pungere” is also an ancestor of “expunge,” as well as a parent of other dotted, pointed, or stinging terms such as “punctuate,” “compunction,” “poignant,” “puncture,” and “pungent.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — pugilism

Good evening, Netizens…

February 26, 2013

Words of the Day

  • pugilism
  • audio pronunciation
  • \PYOO-juh-liz-um\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: boxing
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Long fascinated by the art and science of pugilism, Shane has collected biographies of noted boxers such as Muhammad Ali, Jack Dempsey, and Sonny Liston.

“At 48, Cyr has found a way to make amateur pugilism pay. He's a participant and prime motivator behind an increasingly popular boxing event that pits members of the casino, nightclub, restaurant and even banking industries against each other.” — From an article by John L. Smith in the Las Vegas Review-Journal, May 22, 2012

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The practice of fighting for sport was in place in a number of Mediterranean civilizations by 1500 B.C. (and recent evidence suggests that it may have flourished in parts of eastern Africa before that). By the 7th century B.C., boxing had become a staple of the Olympic Games in Greece. Soon afterward, the Romans picked up the sport and introduced the word “pugil” (a noun related to the Latin “pugnus,” meaning “fist”) to refer to a boxer. Boxing faded out with the decline of the Roman Empire, but resurged in popularity in the18th century. By the 1790s, “pugilist” and “pugilism” were firmly entrenched in the English lexicon.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — idiopathic

Good evening Netizens

February 25, 2013

Word of the Day

  • idiopathic
  • audio pronunciation
  • \id-ee-uh-PATH-ik\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

1
: arising spontaneously or from an obscure or unknown cause
2
: peculiar to the individual
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“Some dogs have idiopathic epilepsy, which means there's no real explanation for their seizures, though even a reasonably mild stressor may increase the odds of a seizure.” — From an article by Steve Dale in the Orlando (Florida) Sentinel, November 13, 2012

“Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, diagnosed before age 16, causes chronic swelling of the joints along with redness, [Dr. Hilary] Haftel said.” — From an article by Amanda Whitesell in the Livingston County (Michigan) Press, January 11, 2013

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“Idiopathic” joins the combining form “idio-” (from Greek “idios,” meaning “one's own” or “private”) with “-pathic,” a form that suggests the effects of disease. The combining form “idio-” is typically found in technical terms. Examples include “idiographic,” meaning “relating to or dealing with something concrete, individual, or unique”; “idiolect,” meaning “the language or speech pattern of one individual at a particular period of life”; and “idiotype,” meaning “the molecular structure and conformation of an antibody that confers its antigenic specificity.” A more common “idio-” word is “idiosyncrasy,” which most commonly refers to an unusual way in which a person behaves or thinks, or to an unusual part or feature of something.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — roseate

Good evening, Netizens…

February 24, 2013

Word of the Day

  • roseate
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ROH-zee-ut\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

1
: resembling a rose especially in having a pink color
2
: overly optimistic : viewed favorably
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Her memories of her childhood are pleasant, bordering on roseate; some of her siblings recall things a bit differently.

“A delectable avocado and bacon-topped burger—smoky and juicy—has a lovely char and an oozy, roseate center….” — From a restaurant review by Joan Reminick in Newsday (New York), January 3, 2013

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“Everything's coming up roses.” “He views the world through rose-tinted glasses.” “She has a rosy outlook on life.” In English, we tend to associate roses and rose color with optimism, and “roseate” is no exception. “Roseate” comes from the Latin adjective “roseus,” and ultimately from the noun “rosa,” meaning “rose.” Figurative use of “roseate” began in the 19th century, and the literal sense of the term has been in the language since the 16th century. Literal uses of “roseate” are often found in descriptions of sunrises and sunsets. “Through yon peaks of cloud-like snow / The roseate sunlight quivers,” wrote Shelley in Prometheus Unbound. And in an early short story, Edith Wharton wrote, “The sunset was perfect and a roseate light, transfiguring the distant spire, lingered late in the west.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — manifesto

Good evening, Netizens…

February 23, 2013

Word of the Day

  • manifesto
  • audio pronunciation
  • \man-uh-FESS-toh\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a written statement declaring publicly the intentions, motives, or views of its issuer
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

On the day of his sudden departure from the company, Rick posted an angry manifesto on the bulletin board outlining his reasons for leaving.

“Mr. Eddie Lampert, the chairman of Sears Holdings and mastermind of the Kmart/Sears merger … famously published a 15-page manifesto in 2009 which covered everything from the economic meltdown to civil liberties, and contained a suggested reading list that included free-market Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek.” — From an article by Mary Jane Quirk in Consumerist, January 8, 2013

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“Manifesto” is related to “manifest,” which occurs in English as a noun, verb, and adjective. Of these, the adjective, which means “readily perceived by the senses” or “easily recognized,” is oldest, dating to the 14th century. Both “manifest” and “manifesto” derive ultimately from the Latin noun “manus” (“hand”) and “-festus,” a combining form that is related to the Latin adjective “infestus,” meaning “hostile.” Something that is manifest is easy to perceive or recognize, and a “manifesto” is a statement in which someone makes his or her intentions or views easy for people to ascertain. Perhaps the most famous statement of this sort is the Communist Manifesto, written in 1848 by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels to outline the platform of the Communist League.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — recuse

Good morning, Netizens…

February 22, 2013

Word of the Day

  • recuse
  • audio pronunciation
  • \rih-KYOOZ\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

: to disqualify (oneself) as a judge in a particular case; broadly : to remove (oneself) from participation to avoid a conflict of interest
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The judge recused herself because she was the sister-in-law of the defendant.

“Planning commissioners in particular have been accused of conflict of interest for being involved professionally in too many projects that come before the commission. Many commissioners recuse themselves when considering projects.” — From an article by Ed Stych in the Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, January 18, 2013

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“Recuse” is derived from the Middle French word “recuser,” which comes from Latin “recusare,” meaning “to refuse.” English speakers began using “recuse” with the meaning “to refuse or reject” in the 14th century. By the 15th century, the term had acquired the meaning “to challenge or object to (a judge).” The current legal use of “recuse” as a term specifically meaning “to disqualify (oneself) as a judge” didn't come into frequent use until the mid-20th century, however. Broader applications soon followed from this sense—you can now recuse yourself from such things as debates and decisions as well as court cases.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — ephemeral

Good morning, Netizens…

February 21, 2013

Words of the Day

  • ephemeral
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ih-FEM-uh-rul\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: lasting a very short time
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The young pop star's fame turned out to be ephemeral.

“During the creation of the ephemeral show—the walls will be erased for a new exhibition later this month, leaving only a series of framed drawings behind—Ms. Dary visited the local library and copied pages from a 100-year-old local directory.” — From an article by Tammy La Gorce in the New York Times, January 4, 2013

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The mayfly (order Ephemeroptera) typically hatches, matures, mates, and dies within the span of a few short hours (though the longest-lived species may survive a record two days); poets sometimes use this insect to symbolize life's ephemeral nature. When “ephemeral” (from the Greek word “ephēmeros,” meaning “lasting a day”) first appeared in print in English in the late 16th century, it was a scientific term applied to short-term fevers, and later, to organisms (such as insects and flowers) with very short life spans. Soon after that, it acquired an extended sense referring to anything fleeting and short-lived (as in “ephemeral pleasures”).

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — portend

Good evening, Netizens…

February 18, 2013

Word of the Day

  • portend
  • audio pronunciation
  • \por-TEND\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to give an omen or anticipatory sign of
2
: indicate, signify
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

In the short story, the appearance of a black cat portends danger for the protagonist.

“These changes portend better possibilities for American manufacturers and American job growth….” — From an article by James Fallows in The Atlantic, November 28, 2012

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“Portend” has been used in English in the context of signs of things to come since the 15th century. The word derives from the Latin verb “portendere,” which means “to predict or foretell.” That verb, in turn, developed as a combination of the prefix “por-” (meaning “forward”) and the verb “tendere” (meaning “to stretch”). So you can think of “portend” as having a literal meaning of “stretching forward to predict.” Additional descendants of “tendere” include “extend,” “tendon,” and “tension,” among others.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — largesse

Good morning, Netizens…

February 02, 2013

Words of the Day

  • largesse
  • audio pronunciation
  • \larh-ZHESS\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: liberal giving (as of money) to or as if to an inferior; also : something so given
2
: generosity
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Thanks to their grandparents' largesse, both children were able to go to college.

“Just how heavily a borrower may rely on family largess to cover a down payment depends on the type of mortgage involved and the size of the gift. With a conventional loan, lenders require that borrowers contribute at least 5 percent of their own money.” — From an article by Lisa Prevost in New York Times, January 2, 2013

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  •  

The word “largesse,” which also can be spelled “largess” (as in our second example sentence), has been part of the English language since at least the 13th century. It derives via Anglo-French from the Latin word “largus,” meaning “abundant” or “generous.” “Largus” is also the source of our word “large.” As far back as the 14th century, we used the word “largeness” as a synonym of “largesse” (“liberal giving”). In fact, that may have been the first sense of “largeness,” which has since come to refer to physical magnitude and bulk more often than to magnanimity.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — amortize

Good morning, Netizens…

February 01, 2013

Words of the Day

  • amortize
  • audio pronunciation
  • \AM-er-tyze\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to pay off (as a mortgage) gradually usually by periodic payments of principal and interest or by payments to a sinking fund
2
: to gradually reduce or write off the cost or value of (as an asset)
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“It's time we made permanent decisions on policy that begin to amortize and reduce our debt over time….” — Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA) on CNBC's “Squawk Box,” January 4, 2013

“As early as 1990-91, the government began to amortize the surplus to better reflect the pension liabilities it would be on the hook for in the future.” — From an article by Kathryn May in the Ottawa Citizen, December 20, 2012

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When you amortize a loan, you “kill it off” gradually by paying it down in installments. This is reflected in the word's etymology. “Amortize” derives via Middle English and Anglo-French from Vulgar Latin “admortire,” meaning “to kill.” The Latin noun “mors” (“death”) is a root of “admortire”; it is related to our word “murder,” and it also gave us a word naming a kind of loan that is usually amortized: “mortgage.” “Amortize” carries a different meaning in the field of corporate finance, where it means to depreciate the cost or value of an asset (as, for example, to reduce interest revenue on that asset for tax purposes).

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — jabberwocky

Good morning, Netizens…

January 31, 2013

Words of the Day

  • jabberwocky
  • audio pronunciation
  • \JAB-er-wah-kee\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: meaningless speech or writing
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“The salesman started spewing computer jabberwocky at me like an auctioneer. I understood about every sixth word he uttered.”— From an article by Larry D. Clifton in The Tampa Tribune, September 6, 1998

“When LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh stepped into the crowded room, fashionably late, jabberwocky ceased and the only sound you heard was the whir and click of cameras.”— From an article by Greg Cote in The Miami Herald, September 28, 2010

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In a poem titled “Jabberwocky” in the book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There (1872), Lewis Carroll warned his readers about a frightful beast:

Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

This nonsensical poem caught the public's fancy, and by 1902 “jabberwocky” was being used as a generic term for meaningless speech or writing. The word “bandersnatch” has also seen some use as a general noun, with the meaning “a wildly grotesque or bizarre individual.” It's a much rarer word than “jabberwocky,” though, and is entered only in our unabridged dictionary, Webster’s Third New International.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — malafide

Good evening Netizens…

January 30, 2013

Words of the Day

  • mala fide
  • audio pronunciation
  • \mal-uh-FYE-dee\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adverb or adjective

: with or in bad faith
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

The company's board is accused of acting mala fide and with criminal intentions.

“NTC analyzes each traveler's risk before departure to identify … criminal activity, fraud, and other mala fide travelers, including U.S. citizens.” — From a document in Congressional Documents and Publications, September 11, 2012

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You may be familiar with the more commonly used “bona fide” (boh-nuh-FYE-dee), which can mean “made in good faith” (as in “a bona fide agreement”) or “genuine or real” (“a bona fide miracle”). You also may have encountered the noun “bona fides,” used in reference to evidence of a person's good faith, genuineness, qualifications, or achievements. Not surprisingly, in Latin “bona fide” means “in good faith” and “mala fide” means “in bad faith.” These days “mala fide,” which dates from the mid-16th century, tends to turn up primarily in legal contexts.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#zlWv1wJqWtZgCYHE.99

Words of the day — nomothetic

Good morning, Netizens…

January 29, 2013

Words of the Day

  • nomothetic
  • audio pronunciation
  • \nah-muh-THET-ik\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: relating to, involving, or dealing with abstract, general, or universal statements or laws
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“Even the authors that emphasize the existence of cross-cultural differences … acknowledge that a nomothetic characterization of a country cannot apply equally to every member of its population.” — From an article by Jaime Bonache et al. in the Journal of Business Research, December 2012

“Moreover, there is the often-incorrect assumption that crimes and offenders are sufficiently similar to be lumped together for aggregate study. In such cases the resulting nomothetic knowledge is not just diluted, it is inaccurate and ultimately misleading.” — From Brent E. Turvey's 2011 book Criminal Profiling: An Introduction to Behavioral Evidence Analysis, Fourth Edition

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“Nomothetic” is often contrasted with “idiographic,” a word meaning “relating to or dealing with something concrete, individual, or unique.” Where “idiographic” points to the specific and unique, “nomothetic” points to the general and consistent. The immediate Greek parent of “nomothetic” is a word meaning “of legislation”; the word has its roots in “nomos,” meaning “law,” and “-thetēs,” meaning “one who establishes.” “Nomos” has played a part in the histories of words as varied as “metronome,” “autonomous,” and “Deuteronomy.” The English contributions of “-thetēs” are meager (“nomothetic” is the only one in our Collegiate dictionary), but “-thetēs” itself comes from “tithenai,” meaning “to put,” and “tithenai” is the ancestor of many common words ending in “thesis”—“hypothesis,” “parenthesis,” “prosthesis,” “synthesis,” and “thesis” itself—as well as “theme,” “epithet,” and “apothecary.”

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/2013/01/29/#FslIDFhmQkl4Xa1R.99

Words of the day — gambit

Good evening, Netizens…

January 28, 2013

Word of the Day

  • gambit
  • audio pronunciation
  • \GAM-bit\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

1
: a chess opening in which a player risks minor pieces to gain an advantage
2
: a remark intended to start a conversation
3
: a calculated move
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Mentioning that he had nothing to do on Saturday night was an obvious gambit by Miles to get invited to Donna's party.

“Square's gift card gambit is its latest stab at separating itself from a crowded field of competitors, including PayPal, Google, Intuit and Groupon.” — From an article by Jon Swartz in USA Today, December 10, 2012

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  •  

In 1656, a chess handbook was published that was said to have almost a hundred illustrated “gambetts.” That early spelling of “gambit” is close to the Italian word, “gambetto,” from which it is derived. “Gambetto” was used for an act of tripping—especially one that gave an advantage, as in wrestling. The original chess gambit is an opening in which a bishop's pawn is sacrificed to gain some advantage, but the name is now applied to many other chess openings. After being pinned down to chess for about two centuries, “gambit” finally broke free of the hold and showed itself to be a legitimate contender in the English language by weighing in with other meanings.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — satiate

Good morning, Netizens…

January 25, 2013

Word of the Day

  • satiate
  • audio pronunciation
  • \SAY-shee-ayt\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

: to satisfy (as a need or desire) fully or to excess
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

After eating three pieces of pie and one of cake at the potluck, Jamie's sweet tooth was finally satiated.

“Consequently, I have to satiate my craving for Louisiana citrus at Hollygrove Market and Farm or the Crescent City Farmers Market in Mid-City where locally grown fruits and vegetables abound. If you haven't treated yourself to a market visit lately, do.” — From an article by Melinda Shelton in the Times-Picayune (New Orleans), October 31, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
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“Satiate,” “sate,” “surfeit,” “cloy,” “pall,” “glut,” and “gorge” all mean to fill to repletion. “Satiate” and “sate” sometimes imply only complete satisfaction but more often suggest repletion that has destroyed interest or desire, as in “Years of globe-trotting had satiated their interest in travel” and “Readers were sated with sensationalistic stories.” “Surfeit” implies a nauseating repletion, as in “They surfeited themselves with junk food,” while “cloy” stresses the disgust or boredom resulting from such surfeiting, as in “The sentimental pictures cloyed after a while.” “Pall” emphasizes the loss of ability to stimulate interest or appetite: “A life of leisure eventually began to pall.” “Glut” implies excess in feeding or supplying, as in “a market glutted with diet books.” “Gorge” suggests glutting to the point of bursting or choking, as in “They gorged themselves with chocolate.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the day — engage

Good evening, Netizens…

January 24, 2013

Words of the Day

  • engagé
  • audio pronunciation
  • \ahn-gah-ZHAY\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

adjective

: committed to or supportive of a cause
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Our next-door neighbor Michael, an engagé environmental activist, uses solar power to heat his home and drives a hybrid automobile.

“George MacDonald was a Scottish Congregationalist who pastored an English Congregationalist chapel for a while, drifted away into freelance preaching, but stayed true to his desire to bring an engagé Christianity to workers stuck in the industrial heartland.” — From Valentine Cunningham's 2011 book Victorian Poetry Now

  • DID YOU KNOW?
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“Engagé” is the past participle of the French verb “engager,” meaning “to engage.” The French have used “engagé” since the 19th century to describe socially or politically active people. The term became particularly fashionable in the wake of World War II, when French writers, artists, and intellectuals felt it was increasingly important for them to take a stand on political or social issues and represent their attitudes in their art. By 1946, English speakers had adopted the word for their own politically relevant writing or art, and within a short time “engagé” was being used generally for any passionate commitment to a cause.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— fanfaronade

Good morning, Netizens…

January 23, 2013

Words of the Day

  • fanfaronade
  • audio pronunciation
  • \fan-fair-uh-NAYD\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: empty boasting : bluster
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

Having grown weary of the former governor's fanfaronade and lack of concrete action, voters sent a clear message at the polls and elected his opponent by a landslide.

“I don't intend this as an article about how to divorce oneself from conceit, narcissism and fanfaronade….” — From an article by Phil Guarnieri in the Floral Park Dispatch (New York), August 10, 2012

  • DID YOU KNOW?
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If we tell you that fanfaronade is what fanfarons do, you'll easily guess that “fanfaron” means “braggart.” Both “fanfaron” (a fairly uncommon word found in unabridged dictionaries) and “fanfaronade” derive from “fanfarrón,” a Spanish word for a boaster that probably developed in imitation of the verbal claptrap blared by blowhards. “Fanfarrón” gave Spanish speakers “fanfarronada,” which the French borrowed with the spelling “fanfaronnade”; English speakers further modified the French term into “fanfaronade” in the mid-1600s. Some etymologists believe English speakers borrowed “fanfaron” directly from Spanish, but others think that word also passed through French before reaching our language. It isn't clear whether “fanfaron” and “fanfaronade” are directly related to the similar “fanfare” or if that term arose as yet another transliteration of the sound of a showy or pompous display.

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— euchre

Good morning, Netizens…

January 22, 2013

Words of the Day

  • euchre
  • audio pronunciation
  • \YOO-ker\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

verb

1
: to prevent from winning three tricks in the card game euchre
2
: to cheat or trick
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“'You fooled us good,' Frank confessed. 'After Northfield, Jesse knew we'd been euchred somehow. But I wouldn't have suspected you in a thousand years.'” — From Matt Braun's 2008 novel Manhunter / Deadwood

“He'd never held a pick or shovel in those waxy white hands. His principal business was euchring anyone who was sucker enough to do business with him.” — From Richard S. Wheeler's 2005 novel Seven Miles to Sundown

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  •  

Euchre is a card game for four players that is played in tricks, or rounds, with a deck of 32 cards. Etymologists aren't sure where we got the name for the game, though they do know that it first appeared in English in the mid-19th century. The first sense of the verb “euchre” arose from an action that takes place during the game: a player is “euchred” when an opponent blocks him or her from winning three or more tricks after making trump. Deception can often be key to a winning strategy, and sure enough it took almost no time at all for “euchre” to develop a sense meaning “cheat” or “trick.”

From Merriam-Webster Online at www.Merriam-Webster.com.

 

Dave

Words of the Day— zarzuela

Good morning, Netizens…

January 21, 2013

Words of the Day

  • zarzuela
  • audio pronunciation
  • \zahr-ZWAY-luh\
  • DEFINITION
  •  

noun

: a usually comic Spanish operetta
  • EXAMPLES
  •  

“The first major trip was leaving Spain, with my sister and our aunt, to travel by ship to Mexico, where my parents had set up their own zarzuela company.” — From an interview with Placido Domingo in the Chicago Tribune, October 14, 2012

“In Napa, Calif., the Jarvis Conservatory presents one or two zarzuelas during the month of June and produces the only DVD of zarzuelas.” — From an article by Alicia Garcia Clark in The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, October 23, 2006

  • DID YOU KNOW?
  •  

“Zarzuela” is connected with the Spanish opera La Zarzuela, which entranced audiences with its different vocal and musical styles. The word toured into English in the 18th century. Alfred Einstein (the musicologist cousin of Albert) assisted in its establishment in the language by including it in his 1947 work Music in the Romantic Era. More recently, the word has begun to appear on the Spanish culinary stage as a term for a rich and savory seafood dish. A couple of the specific entrées that have emerged are the piebald “zarzuela de maiscos,” a mixture of seafood, and the “zarzuela de pescados,” a potpourri of fish.

Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/#VEQAJQxo7Y8ur4d0.99

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