EndNotes

Carly Crooks: A daughter's wise grief

At sunrise, the moon heads for the western  horizon while morning fog that had settled over the Spokane River in Peaceful Valley begins to rise with the sun in 2002. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)
At sunrise, the moon heads for the western horizon while morning fog that had settled over the Spokane River in Peaceful Valley begins to rise with the sun in 2002. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)

Carly Crooks, 11, recently wrote a book report for her class that her father, Gary Crooks, associate editor on the newspaper's editorial board, first heard during conferences. Father and teacher were both in tears afterward.

Gary's wife, Laura, died suddenly five years ago. She was a journalist here, too. And just 37 when she died. Carly was only 6 years old.

From Carly's book report (about a girl waiting for her mother to come home), Carly's understanding of grief is profound and moving. Here are two excerpts, but please, treat yourself today and read the whole thing here.

When my mother was dying in the hospital, I had to wait with my brother at our neighbor’s house. Wait, for what I was worried my dad would say. That she isn’t coming home. I still wish I had said “I love you” to her before it happened.

It is clear that since people die every day, we are lucky that our loved ones come home. Even if they never do, it’s important we keep them forever in our hearts, because they are always at home there.

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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