EndNotes

Hallowed, holy and fun

A simple mason jar can be transformed into a Halloween candle with a little glass etching. (Maggie Bullock)
A simple mason jar can be transformed into a Halloween candle with a little glass etching. (Maggie Bullock)

A trilogy of holidays is upon us. While the children are counting their trick-or-treat candy pieces, other folks will be preparing for the other holidays which are attached to Halloween (All Hallows' Eve).   

November 1 is All Saints' Day - a feast day in the Catholic Church and some Protestant denominations when believers honor all saints - known and unknown.  

November 2 is All Souls' Day - a feast that observes the departed souls who didn't make it to sainthood status. Basically, our deceased friends and loved ones.  

The tradition of going door to door and asking for candy is similar to the late medieval practice of souling: when poor people would go to homes and ask for food in exchange for saying prayers for the dead on All Souls' Day.  

Today, the Day of the Dead, as it is known in the Latin American culture, is gaining popularity in the United States.  Often families will take picnics to the cemetery and decorate the graves of deceased love ones.

 Whatever your beliefs  at Hallows' Eve, the kids are cute, the candy is tasty and everyday is a good one for remembering those whose earthly journeys have ceased.

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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