EndNotes

We're dying at home more and more

Hospice of Spokane is celebrating its 35th anniversary this fall. Four of the people in from the earliest days included from left, Barb Savage, Marj Humphrey, along with Barb and Johnny Cox. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)
Hospice of Spokane is celebrating its 35th anniversary this fall. Four of the people in from the earliest days included from left, Barb Savage, Marj Humphrey, along with Barb and Johnny Cox. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

The National Institutes of Health sent out a report yesterday that detailed some snapshots of life of older Americans. The one that caught my eye, of course, was this announcement:

The percentage of older people who received hospice care in the last 30 days of life increased from 19 percent in 1999 to 43 percent in 2009. The percentage of older Americans who died in hospitals dropped from 49 percent in 1999 to 32 percent in 2009. The percentage who died at home increased from 15 percent in 1999 to 24 percent in 2009.

My prediction: In 10 years, up to 75 percent of people will die at home. And Hospices will boom in communities, both for profit and nonprofit.

(Dan Pelle/S-R photo of 2012 reunion of founders of Hospice of Spokane, left to right, Barb Savage, Marj Humphrey, Barb Cox and Johnny Cox)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.





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