EndNotes

TUESDAY, JAN. 10, 2012, 2:24 P.M.

Driving through grief

 A woman is comforted as friends and relatives of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks gather for a commemoration ceremony at Zuccotti Park, adjacent to ground zero, on the eighth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, Friday, Sept. 11, 2009 in New York.  (Jason Decrow / Associated Press)
A woman is comforted as friends and relatives of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks gather for a commemoration ceremony at Zuccotti Park, adjacent to ground zero, on the eighth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, Friday, Sept. 11, 2009 in New York. (Jason Decrow / Associated Press)

In our column today, we answered the question whether men and women grieve differently. They don't -- necessarily. Some men in grief cry without shame. Some women don't cry much at all.

There is one major difference, according to Matt Kinder of Hospice of Spokane.

Men are often reluctant to seek out grief support groups. "One hospice was trying to start a support group, but men wouldn’t come,” Kinder said. “So they called it a ‘men’s lunch.’ It was a grief group without calling it a grief group. It was part educational, and there was something to do – eat. If men are on a drive, or fishing, or on a walk, they might talk.”

So if you are spending time with a man who is grieving, you might want to try a walk, a long drive, a hike. These work well for teens of both genders, too.

(S-R archive photo)




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