EndNotes

Post-storm topics

 This scene shows frozen trees on the campus of Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, N.H., Saturday, Dec. 13, 2008. Cold weather continued to keep ice on trees in the region after a devastating ice storm destroyed utility poles, wires and other equipment, making some roads impassable. Utility officials trying to recover from the ice storm in the Northeast warned there could be more outages Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008 as drooping branches shed ice and snap back to their original positions, potentially taking out more power lines.  (Steve Hooper / Associated Press)
This scene shows frozen trees on the campus of Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, N.H., Saturday, Dec. 13, 2008. Cold weather continued to keep ice on trees in the region after a devastating ice storm destroyed utility poles, wires and other equipment, making some roads impassable. Utility officials trying to recover from the ice storm in the Northeast warned there could be more outages Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008 as drooping branches shed ice and snap back to their original positions, potentially taking out more power lines. (Steve Hooper / Associated Press)

We lived through a BIG storm in Puget Sound last week: snow, ice, wind and today black ice on the roads.

When talking with friends, the first topic was always, “Got power?” But after that the litany of loss took precedence. And at the top of that list? Trees.

“We lost the apple tree,” friends say wistfully. “Bethy would always go sit in the crook of that tree when she was mad, upset. Now the tree is down and destroyed.” Bethy is now a woman in her mid-twenties.

Trees provide shade, shelter for our creatures and a sense of home. We measure our time through their growth.

The maple tree I gave my husband for Valentine’s Day 18 years ago survived, but lost a branch.

The memorial tree planted after my dad died, didn’t appear to even bend through all the raging weather. Come to think of it, Dad never did either.

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.





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