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EndNotes

Mon., Nov. 26, 2012, 11:16 a.m.

What five words describe old people?

Betty White is among an increasing number of 90-plus-year-olds that remain vital and active. (Associated Press)
Betty White is among an increasing number of 90-plus-year-olds that remain vital and active. (Associated Press)

Be careful how you refer to older people. Your words may become your destiny when you are older.

According to a recent HealthDayNews article: Seniors who tend to think of other older people as spry instead of decrepit are far more likely to bounce back after a serious disability than people with a more negative outlook, according to a new study. Older people who had positive age stereotypes were 44 percent more likely to recover completely from a severe disability. They also were 23 percent more likely to progress from a severe disability to a mild disability.

Interesting stuff first published as a research letter in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

What five words would you use to describe older people?

(S-R archive photo of Betty White)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.