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EndNotes

Thu., Sept. 27, 2012, 10:12 a.m.

Grief practices: Who taught you?

Syrup is a key to the taste of canned peaches.  (File / The Spokesman-Review)
Syrup is a key to the taste of canned peaches. (File / The Spokesman-Review)

Experts say the language and practices of grief are best learned at home, when we are little, role-modeled by the adults in our life.

The poem What I Learned from My Mother by Julia Kasdorf is a great explainer of this. Here's an excerpt:

I learned to save jars

large enough to hold fruit salad for a whole

grieving household, to cube home-canned pears

and peaches...

I learned that whatever we say means nothing,

what anyone will remember is that we came.

Who taught you what to do when someone dies or is sick?

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.