EndNotes

Turning up - and out - the degrees

Elizabeth Roberts,  who received a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Washington State University, smiles during graduation ceremonies on Saturday at Beasley Performing Arts Coliseum in Pullman. The Spokesman Review (Photos by TYLER TJOMSLAND The Spokesman Review / The Spokesman-Review)
Elizabeth Roberts, who received a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Washington State University, smiles during graduation ceremonies on Saturday at Beasley Performing Arts Coliseum in Pullman. The Spokesman Review (Photos by TYLER TJOMSLAND The Spokesman Review / The Spokesman-Review)

Many of us in the Boomer generation took the traditional route through education: graduate from high school and then off to college: maybe a two-year degree, maybe a four-year degree. But with education costs skyrocketing and the rest of life not always offering an easy path, institutions are beginning to offer realistic and creative options for eager learners to integrate their “life learning” into their college education.

Online universities, independent learning options, and assessments of education through life experience can translate into earned credits and eventually a degree. Finally, some common sense and wisdom applied to institutions of higher learning.

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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