EndNotes

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 2013, 9:07 A.M.

Boston bombing: One month ago today

A woman wipes a tear at a memorial for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing on Boylston Street near the race finish line, Monday, April 22, 2013, in Boston, Mass. At 2:50 p.m., exactly one week after the bombings, many bowed their heads and cried at the makeshift memorial on Boylston Street, three blocks from the site of the explosions, where bouquets of flowers, handwritten messages, and used running shoes were piled on the sidewalk. (Robert Bukaty / Associated Press)
A woman wipes a tear at a memorial for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing on Boylston Street near the race finish line, Monday, April 22, 2013, in Boston, Mass. At 2:50 p.m., exactly one week after the bombings, many bowed their heads and cried at the makeshift memorial on Boylston Street, three blocks from the site of the explosions, where bouquets of flowers, handwritten messages, and used running shoes were piled on the sidewalk. (Robert Bukaty / Associated Press)

NPR's Morning Edition had an excellent report on the Boston bombing which happened one month ago today.

Only one business has not reopened. And the reporter talked to many witnesses who were there that day.

Their comments reflected how grief works.

One man said his birthday was coming up soon and after that, he was putting the memories away.

"If you dwell on it, it will swallow you up. Every wound needs to heal."

A grief therapist said there should be no timetable to the grief. Some will move on; others it will take a long time.

Several said: "The vision of that will never disappear."

One young man choked up when he said: "I remember walking over people" and he thought: Not as hurt as some others. So he walked to the more injured. But he wonders: Who am I to make the decision?

A firefighter friend gave him this advice: "You cry. You let it out."

It is good our culture is getting more conversant in grief. And so many are willing to step in and help others as they struggle through grief that lasts a lot longer than one month.

(S-R archive photo)




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