EndNotes

MONDAY, NOV. 18, 2013, 12:56 P.M.

Do you see who I see?

In this Sept. 26, 2013 photo, 80-year-old Marianne Blomberg works out at a gym in Stockholm. Much of the world is not prepared to support the ballooning population of elderly people, including many of the fastest-aging countries, according to a global study scheduled to be released Tuesday, Oct. 1, by the United Nations and an elder rights group. The Swedish government has suggested people continue working beyond 65, a prospect Blomberg cautiously welcomes but warns should not be a requirement. (Jonas Ekstromer / Tt News Agency)
In this Sept. 26, 2013 photo, 80-year-old Marianne Blomberg works out at a gym in Stockholm. Much of the world is not prepared to support the ballooning population of elderly people, including many of the fastest-aging countries, according to a global study scheduled to be released Tuesday, Oct. 1, by the United Nations and an elder rights group. The Swedish government has suggested people continue working beyond 65, a prospect Blomberg cautiously welcomes but warns should not be a requirement. (Jonas Ekstromer / Tt News Agency)

Ted Ketcham’s Boomer U story today reminds readers of their view of the world - and who is in it. The invisibility factor presents not just with age, but with disabilities, sexual orientation, gender and other defining qualities.

Yes, there is a certain grace that comes with blending in and not having to be in charge. But when you want your presence or voice to be acknowledged, to be shunned is “soul-crushing.”

Have you experienced the “invisible factor?"

(S-R archive photo:Sept. 26, 2013 photo, 80-year-old Marianne Blomberg works out at a gym in Stockholm.)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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