EndNotes

Oldest child = smarter?

Students stand in a school courtyard as they wait for the first day of classes to begin, in Mexico City, Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. Mexican children returned to classrooms Monday, and they were getting a quick lesson: Not just school kids make mistakes. Their brand new textbooks have the kinds of errors that they are supposed to be learning not to make: words written with a
Students stand in a school courtyard as they wait for the first day of classes to begin, in Mexico City, Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. Mexican children returned to classrooms Monday, and they were getting a quick lesson: Not just school kids make mistakes. Their brand new textbooks have the kinds of errors that they are supposed to be learning not to make: words written with a "c'' instead of an "s," too many commas, not enough accents and at least one city located in the wrong state. (Ivan Aguirre / Associated Press)

Another study just released suggests the oldest child in a family may be smarter and more successful in life than the younger siblings. Hmmm.

We all know people for whom this theory seems correct. And we all know families where it does not fit - at all.

The attention and care given to a child, opportunities for education, healthy relationships and nurturing circumstances as well as the genetic lottery each person inherits may be more influential factors.

Thoughts? 

(S-R archive photo: Students stand in a school courtyard as they wait for the first day of classes to begin, in Mexico City, Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. 




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.





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