EndNotes

Family matters

Sunny Walker, a stranded motorist on Interstate 285, holds her two dogs while in her truck Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014 in Dunwoody, Ga.  Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said early Wednesday that the National Guard was sending military Humvees onto Atlanta's snarled freeway system in an attempt to move stranded school buses and get food and water to people. Georgia State Patrol troopers headed to schools where children were hunkered down early Wednesday after spending the night there, and transportation crews continued to treat roads and bring gas to motorists, Deal said. (Branden Camp / Fre171034 Ap)
Sunny Walker, a stranded motorist on Interstate 285, holds her two dogs while in her truck Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014 in Dunwoody, Ga. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said early Wednesday that the National Guard was sending military Humvees onto Atlanta's snarled freeway system in an attempt to move stranded school buses and get food and water to people. Georgia State Patrol troopers headed to schools where children were hunkered down early Wednesday after spending the night there, and transportation crews continued to treat roads and bring gas to motorists, Deal said. (Branden Camp / Fre171034 Ap)

The Catholic sisters lost their beloved dog to lymphoma; an elderly dog languishing in a nearby shelter needs a home. Together they form a new family. 

Many shelters across America house abandoned or lost pets. According to The Humane Society of the United States each year about 2.7 million healthy dogs and cats (about one every 11 seconds) are put down;  perfectly adoptable animals are sentenced to death.

Often families want the perfect pet so they purchase a purebred puppy.  However, most families who claim shelter pets will tell you: these affectionate creatures seem grateful for their rescue. And that makes them perfect pets.

Just ask the sisters, whose rescued dog came into their lives and rescued them.

(S-R archive photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.





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