EndNotes

Suicide among our elderly and boomers

A lone tree holding the last of vivid fall foliage is framed by the empty harvested fields Thursday outside the Hutton Settlement on east Wellesley.  (Christopher Anderson / The Spokesman-Review)
A lone tree holding the last of vivid fall foliage is framed by the empty harvested fields Thursday outside the Hutton Settlement on east Wellesley. (Christopher Anderson / The Spokesman-Review)

Boomers worked to have it all – or at least as much of life as we possibly could. But boomers may not be as happy as once thought: And our unhappiness may be reflected in the increase in suicide among this generation (born between 1946-1964). The suicide rate rose among boomers during 2000-2010 according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Today’s stories propose some theories for the increase in boomer suicides: unemployment, ill health, disappointments in dreams unfulfilled.

And while the rate of suicide is on the rise among boomers, our own community’s elderly have the highest suicide rates in the nation and in North Idaho and Spokane County.

The good news: local and national resources are close at hand to help anyone and everyone. Take a moment and learn what can be done to end this mysterious healthcare epidemic.Our friends and families are too important to lose to this tragic ending.

(S-R archive photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.





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