EndNotes

Mama Birds

ORG XMIT: SIN102 ** CORRECTS THE KIND OF THE BIRD TO MASKED LOVEBIRD ** A staff member at the city-state's Jurong Bird Park holds three baby Masked Lovebirds, a 3-week old, right, nibbling at a 4-day old, center, while a 3-day old, left, snuggles into his hand at the park on Tuesday, June 9, 2009, in Singapore. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E) (Wong Maye-e / The Spokesman-Review)
ORG XMIT: SIN102 ** CORRECTS THE KIND OF THE BIRD TO MASKED LOVEBIRD ** A staff member at the city-state's Jurong Bird Park holds three baby Masked Lovebirds, a 3-week old, right, nibbling at a 4-day old, center, while a 3-day old, left, snuggles into his hand at the park on Tuesday, June 9, 2009, in Singapore. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E) (Wong Maye-e / The Spokesman-Review)

The Mama Bird arrived late in the season. She feverishly created a nest in our impatiens plant that hangs in a basket outside our front door. And then: we opened the front door. Mama Bird flew at us and squawked wildly.  “Settle down!” I implored.  I assured her she would be fine. I, too, arrived at motherhood later than my peers. “You’ll do fine. More life experience, broader world view.” Now I exit quietly and she stays in her nest.

I did peek in yesterday when Mama Bird had left for coffee or perhaps meeting up at the bird bath with her friends. And alas, a little baby bird peered back. Hopefully, Mama Bird knows where the best baby bird grub lives…

A high school friend arrived home to Minnesota earlier this year with her three little daughters. She worked tirelessly – for years and years – to adopt them and bring them home from Latin America. She is 60, and the girls will soon be on the brink of puberty. "You'll do fine. More life experience, broader world view."

That Mama knows the rewards of working hard to build her nest.

When we are young, we have plans and naively believe life will unfold accordingly. Life offers different timelines, still we persevere. And if we pause, we really can hear the birds sing. 

(S-R archive photo: three baby Masked Lovebirds, Singapore)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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