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Huckleberries Online

Fri., Feb. 11, 2011, 11:30 a.m.

Extreme weather?

A “Frozen Gore” ice sculpture is unveiled Tuesday in Fairbanks, Alaska. The block, hooked up to the exhaust of a pickup  to make it appear Gore is spouting hot air, is a dig from two businessmen at Gore’s beliefs about climate change.
A “Frozen Gore” ice sculpture is unveiled Tuesday in Fairbanks, Alaska. The block, hooked up to the exhaust of a pickup to make it appear Gore is spouting hot air, is a dig from two businessmen at Gore’s beliefs about climate change.

A “Frozen Gore” ice sculpture is unveiled Tuesday in Fairbanks, Alaska. The block, hooked up to the exhaust of a pickup  to make it appear Gore is spouting hot air, is a dig from two businessmen at Gore’s beliefs about climate change.

Last week a severe storm froze Dallas under a sheet of ice, just in time to disrupt the plans of the tens of thousands of (American) football fans descending on the city for the Super Bowl. On the other side of the globe, Cyclone Yasi slammed northeastern Australia, destroying homes and crops and displacing hundreds of thousands of people.

Some climate alarmists would have us believe that these storms are yet another baleful consequence of man-made CO2 emissions. In addition to the latest weather events, they also point to recent cyclones in Burma, last winter's fatal chills in Nepal and Bangladesh, December's blizzards in Britain, and every other drought, typhoon and unseasonable heat wave around the world.

But is it true? To answer that question, you need to understand whether recent weather trends are extreme by historical standards. The Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project is the latest attempt to find out, using super-computers to generate a dataset of global atmospheric circulation from 1871 to the present.

Is the weather getting weirder?

H/t Bent




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Cindy Hval
Cindy Hval is a freelance columnist for the Voices neighborhood sections. Her Front Porch column appears twice a month in the Thursday Voice.






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