Huckleberries Online

High Noon: Obituaries


Horizon Hospice worker Cyndy Stevenson talks to Meadow Ridge Elementary fifth- and sixth-graders about obituaries that appear in the newspaper and the importance of appreciating a life story that has been condensed into a single paragraph. 
 (Photos by Brian Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)
Horizon Hospice worker Cyndy Stevenson talks to Meadow Ridge Elementary fifth- and sixth-graders about obituaries that appear in the newspaper and the importance of appreciating a life story that has been condensed into a single paragraph. (Photos by Brian Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)

Horizon Hospice worker Cyndy Stevenson talks to Meadow Ridge Elementary fifth- and sixth-graders about obituaries that appear in the newspaper and the importance of appreciating a life story that has been condensed into a single paragraph.

I don't usually read the obituaries with the exception of the Sunday paper. Then I take time to read them over. First I look for familiar names, then I check for ages. I always pause for a moment and read the obit of someone my own age, or my huband's age. And I always read the obituraries for those 21 and younger.

How about you? Do you read the obituaries in the newspaper? Why or why not?




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Cindy Hval
Cindy Hval is a freelance columnist for the Voices neighborhood sections. Her Front Porch column appears twice a month in the Thursday Voice.









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