Huckleberries Online

Redux: State Of The Blog -- 2007

Seven years go, I wrote the following op-ed article for The Spokesman-Review, defending blogs from critical dead-tree journalists. Now that we're approaching the 10th anniversary of Huckleberries Online, I thought you might enjoy it:

I‘m amused by media pundits and opinion makers who emerge from their ivory towers occasionally to condemn bloggers. They harrumph: They’re amateurs. They have no checks and balances. Their audience is small. They’ll go away as the fad fades. Many otherwise intelligent newspaper editors and commenters view blogs the same way as crusty Andy Rooney. In 2005, when asked about the CBS Public Eye blog and its policy of transparency, Rooney spouted: “I have never read the CBS Public Eye blog so I have no opinion. I’m trying to find out what blog means. It seems vastly overrated as a communications tool.” For Rooney and other cave dwellers, a blog is a World Wide Web log – you know, like the journal kept by Captain James Kirk aboard the starship Enterprise in the old “Star Trek” series. For some, a blog is a diary. For others, it’s a means to comment on politics, religion and the news. For me, it’s an opportunity to have my own publication online and build a community of regional bloggers, commenters and “blurkers” (blog term for individuals who read but don’t post). More here.

DFO: I wished I had a double-sawbuck for every time I heard that blogs in general or this one in particular was dead.

Question: Do you think the article is as accurate today as it was in 2007?




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D.F. Oliveria
Dave Oliveria writes the Huckleberries Online Blog for North Idaho readers and the Huckleberries print column.

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