ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here

Huckleberries Online

Posts tagged: Coeur d'Alene Tribe

Task Force Denounces Hate Crime

Spokeswoman Heather Keen of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe reports that the Idaho Department of Transportation has already replaced the historical market contaminated with racist graffiti. She encourages anyone with information about this incident to call the Idaho State Police or Crime Stoppers at 1800-222-8477. (Courtesy photo: Coeur d'Alene Tribe)

Tony Stewart of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations sent the following letter to the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe re: racist vandalism found on the DeSmet Mission historical marker over the weekend: “It is with great sadness and concern that we have learned about the hate message scrawled on the Coeur d’Alene Tribal historical sign. It is obvious that the perpetrator or perpetrators have engaged in the most hideous form of racism that has emerged from their deep seated bigotry and prejudice. This is clearly a hate crime with the intent to promote anger and hatred directed at the good people of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. It is unfortunately another example to remind us that we still have a challenge in eradicating racism from the world’s society. We condemn and denounce in the strongest terms this act of hatred.” Full letter here. (Courtesy photo of vandalism: Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe)

Question: Do you consider the vandalism to the DeSmet Mission historical marker to be a hate crime?

Tribe equates Texas Hold ‘Em and golf

BOISE – Texas Hold ’Em poker is no different than golf under Idaho law, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe contends as it fights a lawsuit filed by the state.

Poker is a game of skill, in which players can pay fees to enter tournaments and win prizes for how well they do, according to the tribe, which opened a card room in its casino.

The state of Idaho sued the Coeur d’Alene Tribe in federal court May 2.

The state argued that poker is illegal in Idaho, prohibited both by the state constitution and the law. But the tribe said the type of poker it’s offering – Texas Hold ’Em tournament play – is legal and is widely played in Idaho.

“As long as the state permits a single person, organization or entity to operate a game at any location in the state, whether for charity purposes or otherwise, the tribe is entitled to operate such games in its gaming facility,” the tribe argued. Betsy Russell, SR

Agree or disagree with the Tribe's contention that Texas Hold 'Em is no different than golf?

Christie: Celebrate CdA Tribe

Christie Wood (RE: Fort Sherman Park to be Cheamkwet): Many years ago the NIC Board of Trustees (before my time) entered a nine-point agreement with the CDA Tribe that essentially recognizes their historic contribution to our wonderful site. Prior to the 75th Anniversary of NIC the Tribe did a beautiful dedication of the NIC beach. When Micheal Burke was President they contributed to, dedicated, and blessed our Rose Garden.They have also provided tribal names for our facilities. Every year they grace us with their presence at graduation and say a traditional prayer in their tribal language. I remember listening to a tribal student give an address a few years ago. She thanked the college for making her feel welcome on campus and explained that for many years tribal students felt like they were not wanted. It was heartbreaking to hear that. I could not be more pleased with the relationship we have with the Cda Tribe and I look forward to next weeks celebration of 80 years!

  • Also: The renaming of Fort Sherman Park to Cheamkwet Park will take place at the 80th anniversary celebration of North Idaho College from 5 to 9 p.m. today.

Question: I'm of the opinion that many Coeur d'Alene residents still don't understand the enormous contributions the Coeur d'Alene Tribe makes to its non-Indian neighbors and North Idaho. Do you?

Coeur d’Alene Tribe Denounces Recall

In a statement from the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe this afternoon, tribal Chairman Chief Allan denounced the recall attempt against Mayor Sandi Bloem and three council members: “As leaders, we do the best we can to gather community input and weigh the options. But at the end of the day, leadership must make difficult and often controversial decisions based on what is in the best interest of the greater community. As an elected official myself, I know the difficulties that come from representing a diverse constituency.  Disagreement and differences in opinion are natural in politics no matter where you go and compromise on both sides is necessary. The democratic process has checks and balances already in place for unhappy constituents- they’re called elections.” More here.

Thoughts?

AM: Tribe Reclaims Jazz Singer Bailey

Jazz singer Mildred Bailey performs at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Bailey was known as the “Mrs. Swing,” one of the great white jazz singers of the 1930s and 1940s. But when she died penniless in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., in 1951, few knew her real roots. Now, the Coeur d’Alene Indian Tribe hopes to set the record straight: Bailey was was an enrolled member who spent her childhood on the reservation near DeSmet before hitting it big in Los Angeles. Jim Kershner SR story here. (April 1947 AP Photo/ The Library of Congress, William Gottlieb)

CdA Tribe Touts ‘Mrs. Swing’s’ Roots

Mildred Rinker Bailey was known to fans as “Mrs. Swing,” whose slight, throaty voice won her acclaim as one of the great white jazz singers of the 1930s and 1940s. But the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe is now hoping to set the record straight once and for all: Bailey, who died impoverished in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., in 1951, was an American Indian who spent her childhood on the reservation near DeSmet, Idaho. This week, the tribe introduced a resolution honoring Bailey in the Idaho Legislature, in part to convince the Jazz at Lincoln Center Hall of Fame in New York City to add her to its inductees — on grounds she helped blaze a trail for better-known singers like Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday. “Mildred was a pioneer,” said Coeur d'Alene Tribal Chairman Chief J. Allan. “She paved the way for many other female singers to follow”/AP. More here. (Photo: Mildred Bailey images Web site)

Question: I sometimes listen to my old vinyls of Billie Holiday while writing my Huckleberries print column. She's my favorite female jazz singer. Who's yours?

Allan: Carlson Wrong Re: Donations

Before I respond to Chris Carlson’s recent column attacking the Coeur d’Alene Tribe and Indian Gaming, I want to start by disclosing a few things. First, I support Indian gaming. I have seen first-hand how gaming on the Coeur d’Alene Reservation has transformed this community and delivered our people from abject poverty and a century-long dearth of opportunity. I see the pride in our people that comes from the hope and opportunity that gaming provides. That is precisely the reason Indian gaming was embraced by the United States and the state of Idaho. Second, I echo what many wonderful people in this community have already expressed; I too am tired of the hostility directed toward the tribe based on false information and inaccurate half-truths. That type of hate-inspired rhetoric should not and cannot be tolerated any longer/Chief Allan, Coeur d'Alene Tribe chairman. More here.

DFO: Chief Allan of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is at odds with Publisher Dan Hammes of the St. Maries Gazette Record and Chris Carlson, who writes for the weekly newspaper, re: state oversight of required donations of gaming proceeds to area schools. Carlson has also question the propriety of the tribe contributing designated school donations to the Coeur d'Alene Kroc Center.

Carlson: Still Tribal Gaming Questions

Late last month readers of The Spokesman-Review and the Coeur d’Alene Press may have seen full page ads taken out by the Coeur d’Alene Tribe claiming they had kept the promise made to voters in 1992 to give back 5 percent of the annual gaming net revenues to the support of education. Yes and No. Yes, they have contributed $17 million by their account but it is misleading to say it all falls under the rubric of education. It stretches credulity to see where funds donated to the Kroc Center or to Mark Few’s Coaches vs. Cancer annual fund drive complies with initiative language that pledged the 5 percent would go to support education in surrounding school districts. Money listed for Gonzaga, for example, includes the annual payment for the tribe’s private box at McCarthy Arena/Chris Carlson, Ridenbaugh Press. More here.

Question: Do you think the Coeur d'Alene Tribe has been open enough re: the amount of money it's mandated by law to give from gambling proceeds to public education?

Olson: Negotiate Tribe Hunting Rights

Native and non-native residents of the Coeur d’Alene Indian Reservation are going to have to work out a local solution to their latest conflict over the right of tribal members to hunt on private property if they want to avoid a drawn-out court battle, a federal official said Tuesday evening. Speaking at a confrontational meeting at the Plummer Community Hall, Wendy Olson (pictured), U.S. attorney for Idaho, said there is no single source of law that answers the question of whether tribal hunters are trespassing on nontribal land. “I don’t get to make that decision,” Olson said in response to those in the crowd looking for an immediate resolution to a decades-old bone of contention. “Ultimately,” she said, “it will be resolved through litigation.” But the federal government’s highest law enforcement officer in Idaho advised leaders on both sides to not go down that long trail/Kevin Graman, SR. More here.

Question: Do you think it possible for Benewah County to negotiate in good faith with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe?

St. Maries Paper Wants Tribe Records

The Idaho State Lottery refused to provide records sought by this newspaper under a public records request. The Gazette Record requested public records related to the lottery commission’s oversight of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s compliance with state law relating to its casino. The Gazette Record hired the law office of Christensen & Doman of St. Maries to pursue the request following the newspaper’s reports last month about the tribe’s mandated contributions to local public schools. The tribe is required by law to donate “5 percent of its annual net gaming income for the support of local educational programs and schools on or near the reservation.” Area schools had not received money from the tribe since 2009. When questioned, tribal officials said donations had been made, but would not reveal which school districts received the contributions. Shortly after the story broke, the tribe gave $210,000 to the Plummer/Worley school district/St. Maries Record Gazette. More here. (Courtesy photo: Coeur d'Alene Casino)

Question: If the tribe is required by law to provide a certain level of gaming profits to area schools, shouldn't the record of disbursements be public?

Tribe Not Talking To St. Maries Paper

You read over the weekend about the old claim resurrected by Benewah County Prosecutor Doug Payne that the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe doesn't have hunting rights on non-Indian property on its reservation. Several commented in a thread about the story. But did you see that the tribe refused to comment to the St. Maries Gazette Record. Toward the end of the story about a meeting to discuss the matter, the Gazette reports: “The tribe’s legislative director, Helo Hancock, said the tribe would not comment because they feel they are treated unfairly by this newspaper. “We see a clear pattern involving the tribe in your newspaper,” Mr. Hancock said. “The articles are unfair, biased and frankly defaming of the tribe and until that changes we will be withholding comment.” (St. Maries Gazette Record photo: Approximately 20 people, including local property owners, Rep. Dick Harwood, Benewah County Prosecuting Attorney Doug Payne and Sheriff Bob Kirts attended a meeting on trespassing and hunting on the reservation Sept. 8 at the Plummer Library.)

Question: Is it good policy by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to withhold comment from a newspaper that it claims reports stories in an “unfair, biased and frankly defaming of the tribe”?

Carlson: Mathesons Back In Power

Former Coeur d’Alene Tribal Chairman and Casino Executive (1994-2006) David Matheson, is back in a seat of prominence, his old job as Casino executive, after five years of acrimonious litigation full of charges and counter-charges the press shouldn’t repeat because there were no verdicts and no real conclusions. Any observer of Native Americans, or anyone who has business or political dealings with tribes as an entity quickly learns the internal politics of any tribe are as Byzantine and as complex as any politics anywhere. If one has not been raised in that culture one cannot begin to understand the machinations. … Suffice it to say to outward appearances the Matheson family is back in the saddle of real power. Whether that is at the expense of some other powerful family, which is now out, who outside can say?/Chris Carlson, The Carlson Chronicles. More here. (SR file photo/Kathy Plonka: David Matheson in previous stint running casino)

Question: How much involvement have you had with the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe?

Fired CEO Regains Top Casino Job

The Coeur d’Alene Tribal Council has filled the top position at its casino in Worley, Idaho, with a tribal member who was fired from the same job and sued by the tribe five years ago for alleged breach of fiduciary duties. On Monday, David Matheson was named CEO of the Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort Hotel, a position he held from 1994 until his forced ouster in 2006. “The Tribal Council felt that Dave Matheson was the most qualified candidate interviewed and that the time was right to offer Dave a second chance,” read a statement issued by the council on Monday. Neither Matheson nor tribal Chairman Chief Allan was available for comment on the apparent reconciliation/Kevin Graman, SR. More here.

Reaction?

Expanded Resort Beautiful In & Out

While Charlotte Nilson loves the open feeling and the space at the expanded Coeur d'Alene Casino Resort Hotel, it's the natural aesthetics that most caught her eye. “We're beautiful inside and out,” the tribal council member said Monday following the grand opening ceremony to celebrate the $75 million project. Plenty of praise and thanks were given out during the hourlong event attended by about 200 people, including community, business and government leaders/Bill Buley, Coeur d'Alene Press. More here.  (Coeur d'Alene Tribe photo of Chairman Chief Allan)

Question: How has the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe enriched your life?

Coeur d’Alenes Dedicate Expansion

According to promotional materials, Hn'ya'(pqi'n'n (no, my cat did not just sit on my kepyboard, that's really what it's called) captures “the best of each season”, and uses “fresh local ingredients to prepare each dish from scratch.” It's “a fun atmosphere delivering comfort food with a twist”. Nearly as twisted as your tongue as you try to say Hn'ya'(pqi'n'n, then give up and just call it by its English translation, 'the gathering place”. Items listed among the Chef's Choice items on their menu include a “Butter-basted Ground Short Rib Burger”, “Idaho Potatoes and Beer-battered Fish and Chips” and “Handmade Soft Pretzels with Beer Cheese Sauce”/OrangeTV, Get Out! North Idaho. More here.

Question: Have you bothered to learn the names and pronunciations of places that use Coeur d'Alene Indian language names, like Q'emiln in Post Falls and Yap-Keehn-Um Beach at North Idaho College?

Vestal: Fox’s Stossel Short On Facts

Chief Allan has heard it all his life. Why do you Indians get so much help? Free this, free that, a check every month. Why do you have it so good? “My whole life, everywhere, going to elementary school, going to middle school, going to high school, going to college … I always heard, ‘Why do you guys get all that (funding)? Why do you get those monthly checks?’ ” said Allan, the chairman of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. And so, when Allan heard Fox News bloviator John Stossel’s piece, “Freeloading Doesn’t Help the Freeloaders” – about the negative effects on tribes of the government’s “help” for them – it chapped his hide. Stossel didn’t mention the fictional monthly checks, but he managed to drag out every other element of the arguments Allan’s heard all his life/Shawn Vestal, SR. More here.

Question: Will John Stossel or Fox News respond to the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's complaint re: Stossel's stereotyping of American Indians?

Tribe: Stossel Keeps Up Stereotypes

Marc Stewart, Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe spokesman (re: “Coeur d'Alene Tribe demands Stossel apology”): The argument that treaties and executive orders happened “so long ago” and there for should be forgotten or that the Indians should just “get over it” and be “assimilated” is sadly part of the national political dialogue. It’s paramount to remember that Native Americans were recognized as United States Citizens in 1924. Indians weren’t allowed to vote in Idaho until 1950, others states didn’t allow Indians to vote until 1965. If you put that into context of Native Americans giving up their lives to defend America in wars, you can understand why Indians take offense at those who seek to marginalize them by using loaded words like “handouts” and “lazy” and “freeloaders.”

Question: Do you understand the culture and sovereignty status of American Indians?

MikeK: Teaching Kids To Respect Tribe

Mike Kennedy (re: “Marc: Tribe police have other options”): If the good people of Benewah County want to cast their lot with the likes of Dick Harwood and Larry Spencer, they are free to do so and theoretically I do wish them the best. But I know that decision won’t end well for them. It never does. I, for one, will continue to engage with and work with the people of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, who have after generations of abuse and scorn, pulled themselves up by their bootstraps and built a real future in a tough and unforgiving terrain. My kids are being raised with a respect and appreciation for the legacy of hundreds of years of history of North Idaho. History of their grandparents who raised a family as loggers and history of the Coeur d’Alenes who were the original owners of all of this land we love so much. Mike's entire comment here.

Question: Do you teach your children to respect the tribes in your areas of the Inland Northwest?

Rednecks Target Tribe Bill Backer

Betsy Russell of the Spokesman Review reported that (Rep. Rich Wills, R-Glenns Ferry, pictured) “said he’s received hundreds of calls and e-mails threatening him and questioning his integrity for backing the bill. “I’ve had threats I’d better never go into the county again,” he said. “I’ve been called all kinds of sundry names.” Opponents raised fears, ranging from the tribe taking away the guns of non-Indians who have concealed weapons permits and pass through the reservation to provisions of tribal code being used to impose civil penalties on non-Indians – something that already can occur today on the reservation. “This doesn’t change anything about that,” Wills said. Instead, it addressed criminal violations – saying tribal police officers could enforce state law against non-tribal members, but they’d have to be cited under state law and into state court”/Randy Stapilus, Ridenbaugh Press. More here.

Question: What role did racism play in the 35-34 defeat of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe police bill?

Marc: Tribe Police Have Other Options

Marc Stewart: All of the Tribal Police Department has been to Idaho Peace Officers and Standards and Training and graduated. They are in good standing and you could verify this easily by talking to the Idaho POST. As a result, they are able to enforce state laws in Kootenai County. You can also confirm that with Rocky Watson. The Tribe’s first choice was a cross deputization agreement with Benewah County. That failed numerous times after Benewah County backed out of two deals, including one in December. You can confirm that with Rep. Rich Wills. The Tribe’s second choice was the state law. Since that failed today, the tribe will seriously consider going the federal route. It’s not saber rattling. It’s not being a bully. It’s just a fact of life that people should prepare themselves for.

Question: Should the Coeur d'Alene Tribe look to a federal solution to protect its citizens with law enforcement on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation?

Get blog updates by email

About this blog

D.F. Oliveria is a columnist and blogger for The Spokesman-Review. Print Huckleberries is a past winner of the Herb Caen Memorial Column contest by the National Association of Newspaper Columnists. The Readership Institute of Northwestern University cited this blog as a good example of online community journalism.

Find DFO on Facebook

DFO on Twitter

Betsy Russell on Twitter

HBO newsmakers Twitter list

Latest comments »

Read all the posts from recent conversations on Huckleberries Online.

Take this week's news quiz ›
Search this blog
Subscribe to this blog
ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here