ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here

Huckleberries Online

Posts tagged: Idaho GOP

EOB: Labrador: At least I tried to fix it

Looking back on this summer’s tumultuous Idaho Republican Party convention, which he chaired, 1st District GOP Congressman Raul Labrador says he’s not sorry he stepped in, even though the confab ended in chaos, without any votes on leaders, resolutions or the party platform as two wings of the party fiercely opposed each other. “I think what I keep reminding people is that at least I tried to fix the problem that we had,” Labrador said. “One of my favorite quotes is from Teddy Roosevelt about the man in the arena. I think sometimes politicians are afraid of getting right in the middle of something because they’re so worried about what happens to them politically. I actually wanted to solve the divide that existed in the party.”

Labrador noted that he spent five hours the night before the convention reached its climax trying to bring both sides to a compromise. “It was rejected, and I still don’t understand why it was rejected, but there’s nothing I could do about that,” he said. “The easy thing for me would have been to say, ‘Hey, I’m running for majority leader of the House, I should walk away from this so I don’t have anything fall on me.’ I think that would be the chicken way out, and I don’t do that.” Betsy Russell, EOB Read more.

Reaction?

Idaho GOP divided over event speaker

IDAHO FALLS – An organizer for an Idaho Republican Party fundraiser said she’s having trouble selling tickets because the main speaker is a tea party representative from Washington, D.C., rather than an Idaho candidate.

Marsha Bjornn, who served as the GOP Region 7 chairwoman for 15 years, told the Post Register that her replacement, Bryan Smith, brushed aside opinions of traditional Republicans in selecting Matt Kibbe, president and CEO of Freedom Works.

“People want to hear our candidates,” she said. “They don’t want to pay money to hear a tea partyer from Washington, D.C., speak.” Full story.

Is there anything the Idaho GOP isn't divided about at this point?

Gov. Evans Got Dem Chair He Wanted

When asked, former chairman Greenfield surrendered his post. Gov. Otter is having no such luck. Perhaps Gov. Butch Otter could end the simmering summer saga over the Idaho Republican Party chairmanship if he simply asked for Barry Peterson's resignation. That's what Democratic Gov. John Evans, pictured, did when he became governor in 1977, telling Boise lawyer John Greenfield he wanted his own man in the job. When Evans asked Greenfield to quit, Greenfield's reply was, “Why should I do that?”Evans, who died last week at 89, looked Greenfield in the eye and said, “Because I'm governor and you're not”/Dan Popkey, Idaho Statesman. More here. (Courtesy photo: Idaho Historical Society)

Question: Do you think Gov. Butch Otter should simply ask for the resignation from Barry Peterson, who's trying desperately to hang onto his Idaho GOP chairmanship?

Fulcher sees slim hope for party unity

As Idaho Republicans head to Moscow for the state party convention in hopes of unifying a deeply divided party, state Sen. Russ Fulcher, who unsuccessfully challenged Gov. Butch Otter in the GOP primary, isn’t too optimistic about unity. “We are very, very split as a party,” he said. Right after the election, Fulcher said people began urging him to consider running for party chairman to try to heal the rift. “So I called the governor,” he said, and discussed the idea. Fulcher said he told Otter, “My inclination is not to, unless you say, ‘Hey, look, as a move towards party unity or whatever, I think Fulcher should do this and I would support him there.’”

Otter declined, Fulcher said, instead saying he’d decided not to endorse anyone in advance of the convention, and telling Fulcher, “’If you run and get elected, certainly I’ll support you.’ I said, ‘That’s fine,’” Fulcher said, “but frankly I think that kind of defeats the whole purpose of a unity argument up-front, if you don’t go into that with kind of a consensus deal. … There just wasn’t a desire to try to connect on that front.” Read more. Betsy Russell, EOB

Do agree with Fulcher's assessment regarding GOP unity?

Republicans should rally ‘round school choice

Republicans gathering this week in Moscow should reaffirm their support for school choice. Idaho’s families and children have benefited from the expansion of school options, they like them, and they want more of them.Because of Republican leadership in the Legislature, in the governor’s office and in the State Department of Education over the last two decades, family choices today encompass not only decisions by parents to live in a certain neighborhood because of the quality of public schools, but private schools, public charter schools, home schooling, magnet schools, alternative schools and on-line learning through both virtual schools and hybrid models blending classroom and online instruction.

The numbers tell the tale. More than 19,500 children attended one of the state’s charter schools in 2013-14 (6.5 percent of all K-12 Idaho students). The number of students in Idaho charters have more than doubled since 2006-07. Despite this growth, the state’s top charter schools still have significant waiting lists. This has been evidenced in recent weeks by the number of charters that have had to hold lotteries for the 2014-15 year. Nothing depresses a charter school leader more than telling a family that the lottery for their school didn’t bounce their way. Read more. Terry Ryan IdahoEdNews

Are you in favor of school choice?

Otter, Fulcher Fight For GOP Vote

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter stops to talk with reporters while campaigning door-to-door in Meridian last weekend. Otter faces a GOP primary challenge May 20 from Senate Majority Caucus Chairman Russ Fulcher in his bid for a third term as Idaho governor. (SR photo: Betsy Russell)

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter has built a long political career on disdain for the federal government, stirring talk of freedom and encouraging Idahoans to be the “architects of our own destiny.” So the 72-year-old, a millionaire rancher who ran for Congress a decade and a half ago on a pledge to tell the feds to “butt out” of the state, seems a bit puzzled about his GOP primary challenge by a state Senate leader who maintains Otter is not conservative enough. “Did I ever believe in my life somebody would run at me from the right? No, I didn’t,” Otter said, as he paused from campaigning for a third term as governor, walking door to door in a Meridian neighborhood. His challenger, Senate Majority Caucus Chairman Russ Fulcher, pictured, heads a slate of Republican candidates taking on Idaho’s top GOP officeholders in the primary. The challengers say the incumbents are not true enough to the Idaho Republican Party’s platform/Betsy Russell, SR. More here.

Question: If nothing else, Fulcher deserves credit for giving Idahoans a choice for the GOP nomination, right?

SR: Fighting Obamacare Futile

Republican candidates in Idaho’s primary are being surveyed to gauge their fealty to the state GOP’s platform, which includes a call to repeal Obamacare and resist implementation. But party officials should take their cue from the realists among them. While they may not like the law, they see that the battle is over and further resistance is counterproductive. “It is the law, so I’m trying to work in that context,” Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder told USA Today. U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, pictured, told the S-R editorial board much the same on Thursday, saying the law is likely here to stay and the focus should be on reforming the exchanges to offer more choices and ensure that the newly covered can gain access to doctors. Idaho Gov. Butch Otter, who wisely refused to sign the loyalty oath, doesn’t like Obamacare either, but he knows when it’s time to stop debating and start governing. He has supported the state Legislature’s decision to establish its own exchange/Spokesman-Review Editorial Board. More here. (AP file photo)

Question: Do you suppose that all the uber-con GOP legislative candidates lined up to fight Obamacare in Idaho realize that their fight is futile — that they're just trying to score points with followers? Or do they really think they have a chance to torpedo the Supreme Court-approved law?

Manning: Idaho GOP Left Me

I am proud to be an Idaho Mormon Democrat. Not an oxymoron, there are thousands of Idaho Democrats all across this great state who are also members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I was raised in a Republican house hold by dedicated parents who happened to be devout Mormons.   For years, I esteemed the tenets of the Republican Party as part and parcel to my own moral compass, aligning my political feelings and the political platform of the Republican Party with my firmly held sentiments on social justice and Constitutional protections. … Most recently, I became disenchanted with an Idaho legislature that publicly and unabashedly devalued the funding of Idaho’s public schools. … In recent years, I didn’t leave the Republican Party – the Republican Party left me/Travis Manning, Common Sense Democracy Foundation. More here.

Question: Have you ever switched political parties?

SR: Idaho GOP Tramples Voters

  • Action: Tired of waiting for the Legislature to act, six Idaho cities have passed ordinances that prohibit discrimination against citizens in housing, hiring and public accommodations based on sexual orientation.
  • Reaction: Idaho Republican Party leaders have called on the Legislature to void those ordinances and prevent other municipalities from passing similar ones.
  • Action: Last fall, Idaho voters – via three referendums – successfully overturned education-related laws adopted by the Legislature.
  • Reaction: The Legislature passed a law making it more difficult – some say impossible – to gather enough signatures to place an initiative or referendum on the ballot. Then lawmakers ignored the will of the voters and passed some of the education items anyway.

That’s life in Idaho, where about four out of five lawmakers are Republican, the right to petition the government is trampled and local rule is overruled. More here.

Question: Now repeat after me, fellow Republican: “It's time to quit voting straight-ticket Republican until the Idaho Republican Party begins listening to Idahoans instead of extreme activists.” Got it?

Rasor’s Gays In Tutus Goes Viral

This Dan Pelle SR file photo from the 4th annual Monster Dash in Manito Park/Spokane last fall is for illustrative purposes only.

Cornel Rasor, who chairs the Idaho Republican Party’s resolutions committee, says that he pushed for a resolution to void all local ordinances banning discrimination against LGBT people because he wants to be able to fire any gay man who “comes into work in a tutu.” The Associated Press reported that a non-binding resolution passed Saturday at the party’s Central Committee summer meeting in McCall calls for the state legislature to block anti-discrimination ordinances passed by at least five municipalities throughout the state/David Edwards, The Raw Story. More here.

  • Correction: If you follow the link above, The Raw Story reports that Rasor made this comment at the Central Committee summer meeting. He actually made the comment directly to SReporter Betsy Russell during an interview.

Question: Do you know any gay guys who show up to work in tutus?

Idaho GOP Targets City LGBT Laws

Idaho, like other states, has gained some protections for its LGBT community through municipal ordinances banning discrimination in housing and employment.  It seems the Idaho State GOP just can’t stand that fact!  Yesterday at their annual Central Committee summer meeting the Republican Party leaders of Idaho passed a non-binding resolution urging the GOP-dominated legislature to rescind those protections, making them null and void. Thus far, the GOP-led Idaho Legislature has refused to add housing and workplace protections for gays and lesbians to the Idaho Human Rights Act.  This had led the LGBT community in a few cities to fight for housing and job protections via city ordinances.  And fight they have had to do/Cathy Kristopherson, O-Blog-Dee-O-Blog-Da. More here.

Thoughts?

GOP Axes Plan For Candidate Vetting

Republican leaders in Idaho on Saturday dumped a plan calling for party officials to vet GOP primary election candidates, the AP reports. The rejection came at the Republican Party Central Committee's summer meeting in McCall, where the state's dominant political group was setting its policy direction for the year to come. The proposal was from former Senate Majority Leader Rod Beck, as a way to pressure GOP candidates into adhering more to the wishes of their local party leaders, but it came under fire from an array of top Idaho Republicans, who said it would put decision-making in the hands of just a few people and disenfranchise broader GOP voters/Betsy Russell, Eye on Boise. More here.

Question: Methinks the Idaho GOP just dodged a bullet. This dumb idea might have been too extreme, even for the follow-the-leader GOP faithful. What do you think?

GOP Chair Wants Cronin To Resign

Barry Peterson, Chairman of the Idaho Republican Party, today condemned the ethical lapses of State Representative and Minority Caucus Chair Brian Cronin and called on him to resign immediately from the Idaho Legislature. Peterson’s condemnation stems from the fact that Cronin is accepting payment for consulting and lobbying activities associated with the upcoming referendum while remaining an elected official and serving in a leadership position for his party. “Representative Cronin grabbed headlines by pointing fingers at his colleagues and other public servants who he charged with profiting from their state service,” said Peterson/Idaho Republican Party news release. More here.

Thoughts?

Ex-Dem Exec Pushes Luna Laws

The latest campaign commercial in the fight over whether to repeal Idaho's controversial school reform laws is running statewide, including in the Spokane-Coeur d'Alene market. John Foster, a lobbyist and political consultant who's behind the new “Parents for Education Reform” PAC that's running the ad, declined to identify its financial backers. “We'll file our disclosure reports at the appropriate time, but we're happy to receive enough support to get this ad off the ground, and hopefully do more,” Foster said. “This PAC is just one piece of a larger effort to spread the message of education reform in Idaho, and we'll be announcing more about that in the coming days. It's an effort that is not wholly about this campaign or this election season, it's bigger than that and will go beyond and past November”/Betsy Russell, Eye On Boise. More here.

Thoughts?

Ann Romney Raises $500K In Idaho

Ann Romney’s first fundraising trip to Idaho drew over 200 people and raised about $500,000 Thursday night, said Romney’s Idaho finance chief, Travis Hawkes. The Romney campaign has now raised $3.7 million in Idaho, with Mitt Romney having held five closed-door fundraisers and two rallies in the Gem State. The fee for the event at The Club at SpurWing in Meridian ranged from $1,000 to $25,000 per couple. Sen. Jim Risch, Romney’s Idaho co-chairman, said Mrs. Romney spoke for about 15 minutes. “The themes were the themes of the campaign, and that is that Mitt Romney is the person to turn this country around. She was talking about how competent her husband is, how she’s watched him turn other things around and how he can turn this country around”/Dan Popkey, Idaho Statesman. More here. (AP file photo: Ann Romney with husband, Mitt, at campaign stop earlier this month)

Question: Wonder if she mentioned the infamous 47% “moocher” factor?

GOP Chair Rips Anti-Luna Reform Ad

State Republican Party Chairman Barry Peterson (pictured) again criticized an ad campaign urging voters to overturn state schools superintendent Tom Luna's Teachers Come First education overhaul. The talking points from Peterson aren't new. He has criticized opponents' radio ads that said the student laptop purchase program is an unfunded mandate. But as opponents have taken their campaign to TV, Peterson has ratcheted up the rhetoric. “Do not give into these underhanded tactics of the leaders of the teachers’ union. They are opposed to education reform in Idaho, and it is a shame to see they are willing to go to any lengths to stop reform from taking place — including lying to Idaho’s families and taxpayers.” Heading closer to the final month, this campaign is getting uglier/Kevin Richert, Idaho Statesman. More here.

Question: I'm already fed up with attack ads — and we still have 6 weeks to go. How do you handle all the TV mud slinging during political campaigns?


Read more here: http://voices.idahostatesman.com/2012/09/25/krichert/idaho_gop_boss_teachers_union_lying_antistudents_come_first_ads#storylink=twt#storylink=cpy

Trib: Idaho Extremism Is No Virtue

If Lawerence Denney (pictured) were just one more talk radio crank, his dissociation from reality would be another form of entertainment for ditto heads. And if Mike Moyle were just another Republican Party conventioneer with a self-righteous disregard for evidence, he might settle for his 15 minutes of fame on a cable news outlet. But Denney, R-Midvale, is the speaker of the Idaho House. Moyle, R-Star, is the majority leader of that body. With rare exceptions, what they say goes. And when it comes to Obamacare, here's what they say: “Resistance usually comes at a cost, but the state of Idaho must resist Obamacare. The cost of not resisting will be much higher.” Translation: They resist. You pay. Denney and Moyle want Idaho to refuse expanding Medicaid coverage to poor adults - an option the U.S. Supreme Court gave states when it validated Obamacare/Marty Trillhaase, Lewiston Tribune. More here.

Question: Are Republican legislative leaders in Idaho going to hurt state taxpayers — big time — by digging in against Supreme Court approved Obamacare?

Christie Wood: ‘Freedom!”

Christie Wood is fed up with the hard-liners who are driving state and local Republicans further and further to the right. Unlike other disillusioned Republicans, however, the North Idaho College trustee and Coeur d’Alene police spokeswoman did something about her political discontent. On her birthday Thursday, Wood “woke up with a plan that would set the world on the right course for me again.” She visited the county clerk’s office to change her voter’s registration from “Republican” to “unaffiliated.” Wood told Huckleberries: “It felt so good to be free of ideals and platforms I do not support. The state Republican platform failed to include support for human rights. The national Republican platform has no exceptions for abortions, even if a woman is raped. What has happened to the party that used to be celebrated and recognized for the great people in it like Nelson Rockefeller? Oh, let me guess – too moderate. Not pure.” Wood isn’t impressed with Democrats either, especially after their indecision regarding whether God and Jerusalem should be in or out of the national party platform/DFO, Huckleberries. More here.

Question: Which term describes you best: Party-line Republican, party-line Democrat, split-ticket-voting Republican, split-ticket Democrat, or unaffiliated?

GOP Primary Unmasks Appointments

Idaho governors used to take the word of candidates for key boards and commissions. If they said they were independent, that would do the trick. Not anymore. After the Idaho Republican Party won a federal lawsuit overturning Idaho’s open primary system on constitutional grounds, the Legislature enacted a party registration law. Now, two top Republicans — Gov. Butch Otter and Secretary of State Ben Ysursa — are scratching their heads over what they say is an unintended consequence of the newly closed GOP primary. Three of the 22 boards that must be balanced between parties got out of whack because three independents and a Democrat registered and voted as Republicans in May. They include the Board of Environmental Quality, a rule-making body with far-reaching impact on business and ordinary Idahoans. Also off balance are the Commission on Aging, which advises the Office on Aging, and the Economic Advisory Council, which advises the Department of Commerce/Dan Popkey, Idaho Statesman. More here.

Question: Did Idaho Republicans outsmart themselves with their push for a closed primary?


Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com/2012/08/05/2217674/closed-primary-removes-veil.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com/2012/08/05/2217674/closed-primary-removes-veil.html#storylink=cpy

Idaho Priest Prays For Obama Defeat

The Roman Catholic Diocese had no official comment when Boise Weekly asked about Father Michael St. Marie's choice of words June 22. But St. Marie wasn't simply commenting on the presidential election; he was praying in a very public setting. “Dear Lord, I ask that on Tuesday, Nov. 7, you find a new job for President Obama,” prayed St. Marie, pictured, faith leader of the St. Edward Parish in Twin Falls. “The Diocese has no comment, but I can tell you that the Diocese does not condone or support any candidate for public office,” Diocese spokesman Michael Brown told Citydesk. St. Marie's prayer was greeted by cheers by nearly 400 Idaho Republicans June 22. His invocation opened the Idaho State GOP Convention/George Prentice, Boise Weekly. More here. (Photo from Diocese of Boise Web site)

Question: Would you mind if your pastor prayed for the defeat of President Barack Obama from the pulpit or other public setting?

Get blog updates by email

About this blog

D.F. Oliveria is a columnist and blogger for The Spokesman-Review. Print Huckleberries is a past winner of the Herb Caen Memorial Column contest by the National Association of Newspaper Columnists. The Readership Institute of Northwestern University cited this blog as a good example of online community journalism.

Find DFO on Facebook

DFO on Twitter

Betsy Russell on Twitter

HBO newsmakers Twitter list

Latest comments »

Read all the posts from recent conversations on Huckleberries Online.

Take this week's news quiz ›
Search this blog
Subscribe to this blog
ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here