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Posts tagged: Spokane River

First phase of Kendall Yards Centennial Trail work starts Monday

The anticipated start of construction of the new Kendall Yards segment of the Centennial Trail started today, according to the Kendall Yards Facebook page.

This is part of the Greenstone company's commitment to make the mixed-use near-downtown development a fully integrated part of the riverbank on the north side of the Spokane River.

Phase one of the work goes from under the Monroe Street Bridge to the Osprey Nest Plaza, just west of Central Food.

The embedded video here was shot with Jim Frank, head of Greenstone.

Spa Paradiso looks to open the end of April, taking new digs in Kendall Yard

Valentine's Day related business item. Spa Paradiso, last seen in the basement of the downtown Spokane Davenport Hotel, plans on reopening in a new location in Kendall Yards the end of April.

The full-service spa and salon has been closed since fall 2012. It originally hoped to open in a new commercial building in the Kendall Yards development on Dec. 1. Project managers however didn't finish the building that early.

The spa will take half of the 13,000-square foot two-story building due east of the Cedar Plaza building, which houses Central Food. The other tenant in the new building is The Inlander newspaper.

The building will be the second commercial building at Kendall Yards, a Greenstone multiuse development west of the Monroe Street Bridge and north of the river.

Co-owner Larry Schoonover said he'll start booking appointments in early April. The company will have around 35 employees.

They will lease about half of a 13,000-square-foot, two-story building due west of the new Cedar Plaza Building. A second unidentified tenant will take the other half of the space.

The new commercial building is part of the 78-acre Kendall Yards development, a project of Greenstone Corp. So far more than 140 residential units have been sold or are under construction

Inside McKinstry’s building: a video tour of the 1907 electric train repair depot

 

In addition to the story we ran this week, plus a great slideshow by SR photographer Jesse Tinsley, we produced a quick two-minute video tour of the renovated McKinstry building along the Spokane River.

Colin Mulvany provided additional production tweaking to this video.

McKinstry renovates downtown historic railroad repair building

This is the first third of our SR business story running tomorrow at Spokesman.com.

Along with it will be a photo slideshow by Jesse Tinsley (whose shot is featured here), and a video. The print version will appear in Friday's daily editions of The Spokesman-Review.

Several years ago, Dean Allen was driving around Spokane, in search of a site for a company office. He spotted an aging brick building along the banks of the Spokane River just east of downtown, and he decided it had potential.

Allen, the CEO of Seattle-based McKinstry, now says that large building, built in 1907 and originally used as a railroad repair depot, was the best possible choice. It brought together about 90 workers inside a historic building that Allen hopes will become a gathering spot for other creative, innovative companies and startups.

McKinstry, which designs, builds and manages other companies’ properties, has several offices across the Western United States. The firm has operated in Spokane for about 10 years.

But for Allen and others, McKinstry's restored Spokane building is the plum and perfect example of the company’s core values of innovation and historic preservation. The company didn't take the cheap route; they invested more than $20 million in the project.

Inside the Great Northern Building restoration (hats off to McKinstry)

Lost in the hubbub about Apple and Trader Joe's coming to town is the bigger news that the McKinstry company, a high-end facilities management and design-build firm, bought and is renovating the historic Great Northern Building, on the east edge of downtown Spokane.

In the past few days we got a chance to get a view of what's happening inside and outside the building. The building is on the national historic register; it was originally the repair depot for the first electric railway system that operated between downtown and Liberty Lake and points east.

This cell-phone photo shows “car barn 2” inside the Great Northern Building, which sits between the Habitat building on Trent and the Spokane River. The view is toward the south and toward the Spokane River.

The original wood ceilings and brick walls have been cleaned up and are used as key features in the building plan.

The McKinstry offices will be on the left side of the barn. Some other spaces will be available to lease to commercial tenants.

A permit pulled by McKinstry estimates the cost of restoring the building will approach $10 million.

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John Stucke John Stucke is a deputy city editor who helps build local news coverage and writes about health care, bankruptcy and rural affairs.

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