ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here

Eye On Olympia

Posts tagged: property tax

Eyman getting close to getting Initiative 1033 on the ballot…

Initiative promoter Tim Eyman said today that his property tax measure, Initiative 1033, is close to having enough signatures to ensure that it’s on the November ballot.

“We’ve hit 270,000 signatures for I-1033,” Eyman emailed to supporters this morning. I-1033 would cap the growth of state, city and county general-fund taxes, with any dollars over the cap devoted to reducing property taxes.

To get a measure on the ballot, organizers need signatures from 241,153 registered voters. Since some people sign twice, or make up names, or aren’t registered to vote, etc., state election officials recommend a cushion of about 25 percent extra names.

Eyman says that his group’s validity rate is higher than average, at about 83 percent, meaning that 83 out of 100 signatures are deemed valid when the state runs a spot-check of the signatures to protect against fraud. So Eyman’s aiming for 292,000 signatures this year.

“We had an absolutely killer week last week,” he wrote. “Signatures really poured into our P.O. box in Spokane.” That’s where his colleagues, Jack and Mike Fagan, help administer the effort. Mike Fagan is also one of a crowded field of people running for Spokane City Council this year.

There hasn’t been much public opposition to the initiative yet, but opponents typically hold their fire until after a measure actually qualifies for the ballot, because most don’t.

NOTE: The description of I-1033 above was rewritten to more accurately describe it. RR

 

Second property tax initiative filed…

Homeowners unhappy with property taxes have filed a second citizen’s intiative Monday, trying to virtually freeze tax valuations.

Linda Courtney Cox of Chelan and Kenneth Sinibaldi, a doctor from Lopez Island, filed a measure today on behalf of Washington Voters for Fair Property Tax.

For property bought in 2004 and earlier, their plan would freeze the taxable value at 2005 levels. For newer purchases, the value would be the purchase price plus any renovations. Taxable values could rise only 1 percent a year unless the property’s sold, at which point the value would be the actual sale price.

Washington’s property tax “is driving people out of their homes,” Cox said in a phone interview. Under their plan, she said, people staying in their home would have a predictable, fair tax.

“You’re not taxed based on what your neighbor bought his home for,” she said. “You’re taxed on what you agreed to pay and what you felt you could afford.”

Getting any measure on the ballot this year will not be easy. Proponents need to come up with more than 241,000 voter signatures by July.

Get blog updates by email

About this blog

Richard Roesler covers Washington state news from The Spokesman-Review's bureau in Olympia.

Latest comments »

Read all the posts from recent conversations on Eye On Olympia.

Follow Richard Roesler
Search this blog
Subscribe to this blog
ADVERTISEMENT
Advertise Here