Arrow-right Camera

Outdoors blog

Tue., Aug. 2, 2011, 7:32 a.m.

Tonight: Biologist to explain value of bats

Scott Crocoll holds a dead Indiana bat in an abandoned mine in Rosendale, N.Y., in January. The U.S. Forest Service is preparing to close thousands of caves and former mines in the eastern U.S.  (File Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
Scott Crocoll holds a dead Indiana bat in an abandoned mine in Rosendale, N.Y., in January. The U.S. Forest Service is preparing to close thousands of caves and former mines in the eastern U.S. (File Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)

WILDLIFE --  Learn the global importance of bats and the differences of the 15 species found in Washington during a free presentation by Washingotn Fish and Wildlfie Department wildlife biologist Ella Rowan, Tuesday (Aug. 2), 7 p.m., at the Inland Northwest Wildlife Council auditorium, 6116 N. Market St.

Unusual adaptations such as echolocation, flight, torpor, hibernation and delayed pregnancy are a few strategies that have allowed bats to master their niches across the world and especially in the more temperate regions. 

Each of the species found in the Inland Northwest has distinctions, including the their preference for habitat and diet as well as in their appearance and behaviors. 

These creatures are important to humans in ways most of us don't know.  Check out this program.




You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus
« Back to Outdoors blog
Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

Follow Rich online: