Outdoors blog

Regulators let bad idea slip past rules and reason at Coyote Rock

Both docks in the Coyote Rocks development in Spokane Valley were damaged this spring from the rising waters of the Spokane River. (J. Bart Rayniak)
Both docks in the Coyote Rocks development in Spokane Valley were damaged this spring from the rising waters of the Spokane River. (J. Bart Rayniak)

SPOKANE RIVER -- Every regulator with a clue seems to agree that plans to build up to 30 docks at the Coyote Rock development are a bad idea for the Spokane River.                

The river has emphasized the sentiment -- see photo above -- as spring runoff swept around the bend past Plantes Ferry Park, damaged pilings and nearly ripped out the first two docks to be approved.

However, nobody at the city, county or state level seems able to thwart a bad plan and its threats to struggling native redband trout and the area aesthetics.

My column today, "Coyote Rock docks cause howl," spells out the issue and the importance of the unprecidented upcoming trial before the Washington state Pollution Control Board.

Some paddlers, rafters and anglers are planning to rally with their boats for a play day at Plantes Ferry Park Sunday at noon.

But the real action will start Monday when the Spokane Riverkeeper, Gonzaga Law, and the Center for Justice begin a formal challenge of the permit issued by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife under the state Hydraulic Code. This is the first appeal before the board of the Hydraulics Project Approval process.




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.

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