Arrow-right Camera

Outdoors blog

Sun., March 20, 2011, 8:23 a.m.

Big Horn Show: Takes more than a day to see

David Morris, who publishes the Record Book for Washington, poses with the Washington state record non-typical whitetail buck, which was taken in Pend Oreille County in 1931 by George Gretener of Newport, Wash. The buck's antlers score 236 5/8 Boone and Crockett points even though Gretener sawed off a 9-inch long tine that pointed toward the animal's back so it wouldn't hit the wall when hanging by the original antler-only mount. (Rich Landers)
David Morris, who publishes the Record Book for Washington, poses with the Washington state record non-typical whitetail buck, which was taken in Pend Oreille County in 1931 by George Gretener of Newport, Wash. The buck's antlers score 236 5/8 Boone and Crockett points even though Gretener sawed off a 9-inch long tine that pointed toward the animal's back so it wouldn't hit the wall when hanging by the original antler-only mount. (Rich Landers)

OUTDOORS -- You can't just cruise through the sprawling Big Horn Outdoor Adventure Show, which ends this afternoon at the Spokane Fair and Expo Center.  The best part of the show is in the details.

It's a place to talk and learn from knowledgeable people packed in one place, including experts on river rafting, all sorts of fishing and hunting and other discoveries.

For instance, representatives of the Montana-based HuntingGPSmas.com showed map software that can be loaded into computers or GPS units that shows game management units and the names of private property owners as you move the cursor over the map.

Among all the trophy mounts scattered around the show is the world record Roosevelt elk, which David Morris of Northwest Big Game rescued from a family's outbuilding to show the world.

Morris, who publishes the Record Book for Washington, also is displaying the Washington state record non-typical whitetail buck, which was taken in Pend Oreille County in 1931 by George Gretener of Newport, Wash. The buck's antlers score 236 5/8 Boone and Crockett points even though Gretener sawed off a 9-inch long tine that pointed toward the animal's back so it wouldn't hit the wall when hanging by the original antler-only mount.




You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus
« Back to Outdoors blog
Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

Follow Rich online: