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Wed., May 18, 2011, 9:30 a.m.

Osprey nest has NOAA shipping for answers

A rehabilitated male osprey waits to be released on the beach at Q'Emiln Riverside Park in Post Falls Friday morning, Aug. 4, 2006.  The bird was found, unable to fly, at a riverfront home in Post Falls six weeks ago.  X-rays showed the bird had a broken collar bone and raptor biologist Jane Cantwell kept the bird in a large aviary until it healed. Before release, Cantwell transplanted some flight feathers from another bird onto the bird's wings to replace feathers that were damaged while the bird was grounded.    JESSE TINSLEY The Spokesman-Review (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
A rehabilitated male osprey waits to be released on the beach at Q'Emiln Riverside Park in Post Falls Friday morning, Aug. 4, 2006. The bird was found, unable to fly, at a riverfront home in Post Falls six weeks ago. X-rays showed the bird had a broken collar bone and raptor biologist Jane Cantwell kept the bird in a large aviary until it healed. Before release, Cantwell transplanted some flight feathers from another bird onto the bird's wings to replace feathers that were damaged while the bird was grounded. JESSE TINSLEY The Spokesman-Review (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

WILDLIFE --  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration usually is in the business of defending sea creatures, but last week it was asking for advice about getting rid of some, according to a KING 5 TV report.

Washington state law allows for the destruction or relocation of osprey nests under certain circumstances, as long as there are no eggs involved.

That gives NOAA oficials precious little time to deal with a nest an osprey pair is building in the upper structure of a NOAA ship that's scheduled to set sail in a few weeks.




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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