Outdoors

Study: protected areas not enough to stem crush of human population and save life on Earth

Passenger jeepneys make their way along a crowded public market as people and vendors cover themselves with umbrellas during a downfall in suburban Manila, Philippines on Wednesday June 8, 2011. Traffic snarled as the Philippine capital experienced a day of rain. (Aaron Favila / Associated Press)
Passenger jeepneys make their way along a crowded public market as people and vendors cover themselves with umbrellas during a downfall in suburban Manila, Philippines on Wednesday June 8, 2011. Traffic snarled as the Philippine capital experienced a day of rain. (Aaron Favila / Associated Press)

ENDANGERED SPECIESA new open access study in Marine Ecology Progress Series has found that protected areas are not enough to stem the loss of global biodiversity.

Even with the volume of protected areas, many scientists say we are in the midst of a mass extinction with extinction levels jumping to 100 to 10,000 times the average rate over the past 500 million years, according to a story on Mongabay.com.

While protected areas are important, the study argues that society must deal with the underlying problems of human population and over-consumption if we are to have any chance of preserving life on Earth in the long term.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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