Outdoors

Out of the blue, commission to consider battery-operated decoys

Retail clerk Steffen Gambill holds a
Retail clerk Steffen Gambill holds a "roboduck," while standing near a display of traditional duck decoys in his sporting goods store Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2001, in Seattle. The plastic replica of a hen mallard has a battery-operated spinning flap attached to its back to simulate wing-flapping movement intended to let real ducks know it's safe to land. Duck hunters had been using the electronic and battery-powered birds to lure the real animal into their gun sights until they were ordered to stop earlierthis month in Washington state. (Associated Press)

WATERFOWL HUNTING — The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission will consider a petition to allow use of battery-powered spinning-wing decoys for hunting during a special conference call meeting Friday, 8:30 a.m.

This didn't come up at the recent meeting the Fish and Wildlife Department had on new rules for upcoming hunting seasons.

The only way the public can listen to the discussion — travel to the Fish and Wildlife Department's Olympia headquarters and listen on the speaker phone.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.

By Rich Landers richl@spokesman.com (509) 459-5508


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