Outdoors

Guidelines posted for hiking near mountain goats

A mountain goat in Olympic National Park faced a photographer on the Switchback Trail in the Klahhane-Hurricane Ridge-Switchback Trail area near Port Angeles, Wash., in 2008. Forest Service officials announced Tuesday that Olympic National Forest has closed a trail near Hoodsport for two weeks because of aggressive mountain goats. (Associated Press)
A mountain goat in Olympic National Park faced a photographer on the Switchback Trail in the Klahhane-Hurricane Ridge-Switchback Trail area near Port Angeles, Wash., in 2008. Forest Service officials announced Tuesday that Olympic National Forest has closed a trail near Hoodsport for two weeks because of aggressive mountain goats. (Associated Press)

HIKING — Reports of aggressive mountain goats have forced rangers once again to close some trails in Olympic National Park, where a hiker was gored and killed by a goat two years ago.

Hikers can play a role in preventing these otherwise docile creatures from becoming dangerous in their high-country habitat.  Here are guidelines posted by the Washington Trails Association:

The 50/50 rule: pee off trail, give goats a wide berth

If you only remember two guidelines around mountain goats:

> No matter how cute they are, mountain goats are still wild animals. It's up to hikers to give the goats a wide berth, even if they are standing close to, or even in, the trail.
  • Hikers should urinate at least 50 feet off the trail, preferably on rocks. The animals' attraction to the salt in human urine can bring goats closer to trails (and the hikers on them) than is good for either species.
  • Try to stay 50 yards (or about 150 feet) away from mountain goats at all times. For photographers, this means using a telephoto lens to snap your shots. Never try to approach or pet kid (young) mountain goats. No matter how cute they are, mountain goats are still wild animals. It's up to hikers to give the goats a wide berth, even if they are standing close to, or even in, the trail. If the trail doesn't permit you to go around, consider turning back early.

“If the goat wants the trail, give the goat the trail,” Nancy Jones, a Visitor Services Specialist with the Cle Elum Ranger District, told WTA last year. “Back off. Give the goat the right-of-way. Go the other way.” 




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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