Outdoors

Hot summer leaves bears vulnerable to traffic

A black bear grazes along the Alaskan Highway in British Columbia. The sow was so intent on eating the dandelions, it took her while to notice a group of tourists had gathered with cameras.
A black bear grazes along the Alaskan Highway in British Columbia. The sow was so intent on eating the dandelions, it took her while to notice a group of tourists had gathered with cameras. "She had two cubs in a tree nearby," said Debbie Pierce of Spokane. "Once she realized we were there, she and the cubs took off in a dash." (Bill Pierce)

WILDLIFE — A summer heat wave and poor huckleberry crop is causing trouble for bears in the region by forcing the bruins to lower elevations where they run into conflicts with people.

Heads up:  A grizzly has been seen near Priest Lake.  Keep a clean camp and a garbage free cabin area.

The problem has been more than apparent farther norther in Canada.

This year, 16 black bears, a wolverine, several wolves, and countless elk and deer have been killed on the highways and railways in Banff, Yoho and Kootenay national parks.

The human-caused animal death toll keeps rising — due, experts say, to a late spring and hot summer that has kept bears in the valley bottoms, and also to increased traffic speeding through the park.

Read more in this Calgary Herald story.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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