Outdoors

Sea lions rebound, become viewed as wolves of the sea

A sea lion eats a salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam in this April 24, 2008, photo. (Associated Press)
A sea lion eats a salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam in this April 24, 2008, photo. (Associated Press)

MARINE WILDLIFE — After nearly being hunted out of existence, California sea lions have boomed in population in the 40 years since the 1972 passage of the Marine Mammal Protection Act.

According to several estimates, their number has grown from 5,000 around 1970 to about 300,000.

That growth, however, has coincided at least in part with the decline of a Northwest figure far more iconic and economically significant than sea lions: the salmon.

Check out this lengthy report on the issue by Bill Sheets of the Everett Herald.
  




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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