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Wolves blamed for attacking dogs in Wallace; sightings reported in Spokane County

U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist John Stephenson calculates the stride of an Oregon gray wolf in the snow south of Crater Lake National Forest last week. (Associated Press)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist John Stephenson calculates the stride of an Oregon gray wolf in the snow south of Crater Lake National Forest last week. (Associated Press)

WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS -- The Shoshone County sheriff says two dogs were attacked by four wolves near Wallace.

Sheriff Mitch Alexander told The Shoshone News Press that one dog died and another sustained a facial bite in the attack Wednesday evening, and that there were many wolf tracks in the area.

The newspaper reported that Idaho Fish and Game officials told residents in the area that it is legal to shoot the wolf pack. Idaho Fish and Game official Josh Stanley didn’t return a call for comment.

IN SPOKANE COUNTY, unconfirmed wolf sightings have been coming in to Fish and Wildlife officials -- and to me -- for more than a year.  I've heard of several reports in the Tower Mountain to Turnbull region in the past four months.

Report possible wolf sightings in Washington to the Fish and Wildlife Department wildlife reporting line: (877) 933-9847.

Online reporting is possible on this WDFW  Dangerous Wildlife Incident web page, where you also can see where wolf, cougar and grizzly bear encounters have been reported.

More wolf news from the AP:

Colville tribe to manage wolves on reservation

NESPELEM — Officials with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are making plans to manage a growing population of wolves in northeast Washington.

Remote cameras have photographed at least three wolves, and officials think as many as nine may be living on the reservation.

Tribal wildlife manager Randy Friedlander says the reports of wolf tracks, wolf kills and howling have become more frequent.

Tribal Fish and Wildlife Director Joe Peone told The Wenatchee World the management plan could include removing animals, if the population exceeds more than tribal members want.

Wolves haven’t lived on the reservation for about 80 years. The tribe plans to trap and radio collar wolves this spring to develop the management plan.




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.

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