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Thu., May 3, 2012, 7:42 a.m.

Oregon gets permission to control cormorants to protect fish

An orange beak and more brown than black plumage identify the double-crested cormorant as a juvenile. The double-crested cormorant often swims with just its head and neck above water.
 (File)
An orange beak and more brown than black plumage identify the double-crested cormorant as a juvenile. The double-crested cormorant often swims with just its head and neck above water. (File)

FISHERIES -- As voracious as a wolf and more mobile than a northern pike,the cormorant is finally getting more attention as a peak predator on certain fisheries.

Oregon officials were successful in getting permission to kill sea lions that feed on protected salmon trying to swim upriver to spawn. Now they want federal approval to shoot a type of seabird that eats millions of baby salmon trying to reach the ocean.

The Oregonian has the story.




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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