Outdoors

Study downplays impacts of hatchery-native salmon interbreeding


An Issaquah Salmon Hatchery worker scoops up 3-month-old chinook salmon in  2004. 
 (File Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
An Issaquah Salmon Hatchery worker scoops up 3-month-old chinook salmon in 2004. (File Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)

FISHING — Scientists are rewriting some of their findings regarding the competition in native streams between wild and htchery salmon.  See the report from the Oregonian:


Idaho study: No problems with hatchery, wild salmon interbreeding


A long-term study of summer chinook in Idaho's Johnson Creek found that the interbreeding of hatchery salmon with wild salmon had no ill effects, thus supporting “hatchery supplementation” of salmon populations done by tribes in the Northwest for years.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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