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Outdoors blog

Wed., April 24, 2013, 11:38 a.m.

What do you expect from a sage-land species?

A male sage grouse, sometimes called the “next spotted owl,” dances for the attention of a female sage grouse. (Associated Press)
A male sage grouse, sometimes called the “next spotted owl,” dances for the attention of a female sage grouse. (Associated Press)

USGS study finds sage grouse like undisturbed areas, quiet 

A new study led by U.S. Geological Survey biologist Steve Knick has confirmed that sage grouse need undisturbed habitat and solitude for successful reproduction.

Researchers found 99 percent of the active 3,000 leks studied in 355,000 square miles of historic sage grouse range in the West found were in areas where no more than 3 percent of the land had been disturbed by human activity. --Idaho Statesman




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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