Arrow-right Camera

Outdoors blog

Mon., Aug. 26, 2013, 11:24 a.m.

Mountain goat shoulder wound likely from fight

A mountain goat with a healing wound in its right front shoulder approaches hikers on the summit of Scotchman Peak in August 2013.  (Rich Landers)
A mountain goat with a healing wound in its right front shoulder approaches hikers on the summit of Scotchman Peak in August 2013. (Rich Landers)

WILDLIFE -- My Sunday Outdoors story about the consequences of food-conditioning wildlife mentions the 2010 incident in which a hiker in Olympic National Park bled to death after being gored in the thigh by an aggressive mountain goat.

The horns on a mountain goat are sharp and they come in to foes at a deadly level.

The wound to the shoulder of the billy pictured above likely is a goring wound from another goat, experts surmise.

Hikers who saw the goat earlier this summer on North Idaho's Scotchman Peak said the wound was bloody and nasty looking at that time -- and the goat had a bad attitude about it that forced them to throw a barrage of rocks to get it to leave them alone.

This month, the wound seems to be healing well ... and the goat's demeanor was much more pleasant.

What do you think about media personalities and "experts" who suggest to the public that they have a special touch with wildlife that makes it OK for them to befriend and feed wild animals.




You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus
« Back to Outdoors blog
Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

Follow Rich online: