Outdoors blog

Wide-ranging wolverine opened researchers' eyes

A female wolverine and her cubs are seen in the Gravelly Range of southwest Montana in 2007. The government said Friday that wolverine habitat is threatened by climate change. (Associated Press)
A female wolverine and her cubs are seen in the Gravelly Range of southwest Montana in 2007. The government said Friday that wolverine habitat is threatened by climate change. (Associated Press)

ENDANGERED SPECIES -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposal to list the wolverine as a threatened species is generating more insight into the elusive carnivore.  Even in modern times, wildlife biologists are just documenting the life-history suggested in this quote of the day:

"We put a GPS collar on him and released him there in the Tetons, and he just disappeared. Eventually, he came back to the Tetons and dropped his collar, and we found it. He went down to Pocatello, Idaho, and back to the Tetons in three weeks. It really opened our eyes to how these animals can travel unbelievable distances in a short amount of time."

--Bob Inman,a carnivore biologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society, about the travels of a male wolverine radio-collared during a decadelong study of the species in Wyoming and Montana.
- Jackson Hole News & Guide




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