Outdoors

Guidelines seek reduction in bird deaths caused by powerlines

Marilyn Omler of Ponti Veterinary Clinic noticed what looked like burn marks on the pads of the immature bald eagle's large taloned feet.  It's possible the bird came in contact with powerlines, leading to its poor health.  (Tina Wynecoop)
Marilyn Omler of Ponti Veterinary Clinic noticed what looked like burn marks on the pads of the immature bald eagle's large taloned feet. It's possible the bird came in contact with powerlines, leading to its poor health. (Tina Wynecoop)

WILDLIFE — Countless birds, large and small, are killed in collisions with powerlines that crisscross the country.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been working with the Avian Power Line Interaction Committee on guidelines utilities, compiled in an updated booklet called, Reducing Avian Collisions with Power Lines: State of the Art in 2012

This manual, originally published in 1994, identifies best practices and provides specific guidance to help electric utilities and cooperatives, federal power administrations, wildlife agencies and other stakeholders reduce bird collisions with power lines.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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