Outdoors

Harvest underway for huckleberries -- Idaho's state fruit

Husband and wife Khalid and Susan Shirzad and their children Sophia, 2, above, and Drew, 4, below, experience their first huckleberry- picking outing as part of the  Sunflower Society.  (Jesse Tinsley)
Husband and wife Khalid and Susan Shirzad and their children Sophia, 2, above, and Drew, 4, below, experience their first huckleberry- picking outing as part of the Sunflower Society. (Jesse Tinsley)

FORESTS – Huckleberries, designated Idaho’s state fruit in 2000, have been ripe for picking for a couple weeks in the low areas of Priest Lake, and the crop is gradually ripening up the mountain slopes throughout the Inland Northwest.

Don’t set your purple-tongue ambitions too high, yet.

Outdoors editor Rich Landers found ripe huckleberries for the first hour of hiking up Scotchman Peak Trail 65 northeast of Lake Pend Oreille on Thursday with lots of green berries above that to satisfy berry pickers in the prime picking period of August.

Savvy huckleberry pluckers know certain high areas, such as the Roman Nose Peak region in the Selkirks, are harvest-perfect in September.

Huckleberries flourish in several varieties across the region, from the deep-purple lowbush types in the east Cascades and Pasayten Wilderness to the tiny grouse huckleberry (a.k.a. grouse whortleberry) that grows on 10-inch high, small-leaf plants at or above timberline in the Selkirks and Bitterroots.

The ”big huckleberry” (a.k.a. black or thin-leaved) is the most popular berry in the Idaho Panhandle. This species grows in moist, cool forested environments at mid to upper elevations. The plants grow up to three feet tall and take up to 15 years to reach full maturity.  The single, dark purple berries grow on the shoots the plant produced that year, according to plant ecologist Charles Johnson.

Huckleberries are a treat for humans and a necessity for the region’s bears. A poor huckleberry crop in the Priest Lake area in 1979 resulted in reduced bear productivity and survival for the next two years, according to research by John Beecham, retired Idaho Fish and Game wildlife biologist.

Black bears have flexible ‘prehensile lips’ that can pick individual huckleberries without ingesting leaves faster than a human can harvest.

Bears can be expected anywhere berries are ripe. Pickers should carry bear spray as a precaution.

The annual Huckleberry Festival sponsored by the Priest Lake Search and Rescue is set for Saturday, July 20, at the Priest Lake Golf Course, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Info: Dory Miller, (509) 979-8802.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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