Outdoors

Rarely are deer fawns abandoned; leave them be

A white-tailed deer fawn can be left to lie motionless for 8 hours or more by its mother between feedings. (Laura Rogers)
A white-tailed deer fawn can be left to lie motionless for 8 hours or more by its mother between feedings. (Laura Rogers)

WILDLIFE — “I found this fawn all by itself and want to know what to do with it?” 

It happens every spring and the calls are coming in to Washington Fish and Wildlife Department offices fast and furious this week, says Madonna Luers, department spokeswoman in Spokane.

“Please help us convey the usual messages about leaving baby wildlife, including fawns, in the wild where they belong because their mothers will be looking for them where they left them,” she said.

Does might leave their faws eight hours or more between feedings.

Some fawns already have been picked up and deposited with wildlife rehabbers, including Otis Orchards veterinarian Jerry Ponti, who tends to end up with a small “herd” each year. Even rehabilitated fawns have reduced chances of surviving well after being reintroduced to the wild.

The photo is from the WDFW online Image Gallery submitted by Laura Rogers, who made the shot a couple years ago at this time north of Colville. She calls it “I’m Not An Orphan!”




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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