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Wed., Nov. 20, 2013, 2:31 p.m.

Federal wildlife manager to list projects in North Idaho

Blood-soaked feathers from a dead swan lie near the Strobl Marsh near Rose Lake, Idaho, in April. Lead-contaminated sediments from the Coeur d’Alene River corridor have poisoned  swans. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman Review)
Blood-soaked feathers from a dead swan lie near the Strobl Marsh near Rose Lake, Idaho, in April. Lead-contaminated sediments from the Coeur d’Alene River corridor have poisoned swans. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman Review)

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT -- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service biologist Sergio Pierluissi will discuss the federal agency's activities in the Idaho Panhandle, as well as its recent priorities in the Pacific Northwest region during the monthly program organized by the Kootenai Environmental Alliance on Thursday, Nov. 21, at the Iron Horse Restaurant, 407 E Sherman Ave. in Coeur d'Alene.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the only federal agency whose primary mission is managing the country's wildlife. From the thousands of species protected under the Endangered Species Act, to the millions of acres managed as Wildlife Refuge, the USFWS employs a diverse array of tools to work with others to protect and manage wildlife.

In North Idaho, the agency has been involved in issues ranging from tundra swans dying in the toxic sloughs of the Coeur d'Alene River drainage during their spring migrations to critical habitat for woodland caribou in the Selkirk Mountains.

 




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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