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Tue., Feb. 18, 2014, 2:38 p.m.

Idaho facing up to more pets caught in traps

Gabrielle Duebendorfer, who lives near Sandpoint, poses with her Australian shepherds. Molly, left, was caught around the neck in a snare set by a wolf trapper in February. Duebendorfer was able to cut the cable as the dog choked.
Gabrielle Duebendorfer, who lives near Sandpoint, poses with her Australian shepherds. Molly, left, was caught around the neck in a snare set by a wolf trapper in February. Duebendorfer was able to cut the cable as the dog choked.

TRAPPING -- I reported in December that pets, especially dogs, are vulnerable to traps set out near recreational trails.

As if to emphasize the point, two dogs have been reported killed recently by traps in North Idaho.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is gathering input from lawmakers, recreationists and trappers.

Two pet dogs were recently killed in northern Idaho when they wandered off a hiking trail and into a body-gripping trap set for a wild animal. Currently, trappers are allowed to set traps in many public recreational areas as long as they are at least five feet from the center of any trail. Trappers are not required to post warning signs. 




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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