Outdoors

Has Boldt Decision eroded resolve to save wild salmon?

Bobby Begay washes gill nets, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2000, in Celilo Village, Ore., before fishing for salmon on the Columbia River. Tribal treaty agreements allow American Indians fishing rights along the Columbia River. Gillnettng is being challenged in Oregon. (File)
Bobby Begay washes gill nets, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2000, in Celilo Village, Ore., before fishing for salmon on the Columbia River. Tribal treaty agreements allow American Indians fishing rights along the Columbia River. Gillnettng is being challenged in Oregon. (File)

FISHING — I'm not noticing much celebration of the 40th anniversary of the landmark court decision that awarded Indian tribes rights to half of the Pacific salmon returning to their traditional waters.

It's still a political hot potato.

Seattle Times columnist Ron Judd has written a thoughtful piece about the impacts the Boldt Decision has had on our collective resolve to make sure wild salmon continue to be a thriving icon of the Pacific Northwest.

It's worth everybody's time to think about this subject.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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