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Thu., Feb. 27, 2014, 6 a.m.

Biologists have high hopes for wild-hatched condor

Wild condor nesting is well underway here in the Arizona/Utah population, according to a Feb. 25, 2014, report from the Pergrine Fund. This California condor is on her redwall nest cave porch, about to enter and switch out its mate for incubation duty in the Vermillian Cliffs near the Arizona-Utah border.  (Peregrine Fund)
Wild condor nesting is well underway here in the Arizona/Utah population, according to a Feb. 25, 2014, report from the Pergrine Fund. This California condor is on her redwall nest cave porch, about to enter and switch out its mate for incubation duty in the Vermillian Cliffs near the Arizona-Utah border. (Peregrine Fund)

WILDLIFE WATCHING -- Groups tracking the reintroduction of the endangered California condor celebrated last year when a record four birds hatched near the Arizona-Utah border.

This year has brought increased enthusiasm with the possibility that a condor hatched in the wild will produce the first second-generation wild bird.

Eddie Feltes of The Peregrine Fund says he and others are keeping their fingers crossed.

Breeding is underway for the condors in the Arizona-Utah flock and the captive flock at The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise, Idaho.

Biologists are watching from afar as adult condors incubate an egg in the Arizona-Utah flock nesting at Vermilion Cliffs National Monument.

The captive flock is expected to produce up to 20 birds this season. 




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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