Outdoors blog

Photographers suspected of endangering wolves with bait

Left: A bull elk bugles near the Mammoth area of Yellowstone National Park during the September elk mating season. Above: Grizzly bear sighting quickly attracts a crowd of wildlife watchers and photographers along a road in the Lamar Valley. (RICH LANDERS PHOTOS)
Left: A bull elk bugles near the Mammoth area of Yellowstone National Park during the September elk mating season. Above: Grizzly bear sighting quickly attracts a crowd of wildlife watchers and photographers along a road in the Lamar Valley. (RICH LANDERS PHOTOS)

WILDLIFE WATCHING -- Wildlife photographers have a code of ethics, which apparently was ignored in the case of someone trying to get a photo of wolves in Canada

Photographers suspected of baiting wolves in Alberta national park
A Banff National Park warden who discovered wolves from the Bow Valley Park dining on a turkey carcass and other leftovers said he questioned wildlife photographers taking photos of the wolves about the food cache, but they denied knowing where the food came from, although they did acknowledge that the food was attracting the wolves and they did not report it to park personnel.
-- Calgary Herald

A fed predator is often a dead predator, to expand the adage.

Another case in point: The first Yellowstone wolf that had to be killed for public safety likely lost its natural wariness of humans after getting food from visitors, most likely photographers.

 




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.

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